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Full text of "Catalog"

. «4-lW M 

^88-89 



FOURTH CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

School for Christian Workers, 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. 



£T/ # t INCLUDING THE SPECIAL WORK IN ?f4W'' 

THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN. ASSOCIATION TRAINING SCHOOL, 

"M */■: ';>AND THE ■ . ] ' 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORKERS ^PASTORS' HELPERS. 



CONTENTS. 



Admission, terms of . . .• . . . . 23 

Bequest, forms for . . inside back cover 

Calendar for 1889-90, 3 

College Men, one year's course for 12 
Contributions, how made, etc., ..... inside back cover 

Corporation, 4 

• Design of School for Christian Workers, 5 

Expenses, estimate of , . , . 24 

General Course of Instruction, 10-12 

Graduation, conditions of 25 

Gymnasium Department, special studies and work in . . 17, IS 

" " summer session, . . . . . 28-35 

Information, how to get it, . 26 

Instructors in the general and special courses, .... 6 

Location of School, . . . . . . . . 25, 26 

Officers, . ; ? 4 

Promotion, conditions of 25 

Rooms and Bedding, 2 : ) 

Secretarial Department, special studies and work in , , 13-15 

" " special lectures in 16 

Students, 1888-89 . , - ; w'V. * 7-9 

Students in Summer School, 29, 30 

Summer Session of Gymnasium Department, . 28-35 

Sunday-School Department, special studies in ... 19-21 

" " special lectures in 22 

Training School for S. S. Workers and Pastors' Helpers, . . 19-21 

Tuition and other expenses, 24 

Y. M. C. A. Training School, ........ 13-18 



Fourth Catalogue 



OF THE 



School for Christian Workers. 



Springfield, Massachusetts, 



April 1, 1889. 



CLARK W. BRYAN & CO., Printers, 
Springfield, Mass. 



Organized November 25, 1884. 
Incorporated January 28, 1885. School Opened September 8, ii 




This building, erected for the school, cost, with land and furniture, #43,485. 
is free from debt ; contains sleeping accommodations for 44 students, reci- 
tation rooms, offices for the instructors, a large gymnasium, 
baths, etc., and also a complete suite of rooms for the 
Armory Hill Young Men's Christian Association. 



CALENDAR. 



Commencement Exercises and Annual Meeting of the Corporation and 
Board of Trustees, Tuesday, June 11, 1889. 

Quarterly Meetings of the Trustees on the second Fridays of March, 
June, September and December. 

Summer Session of the Gymnasium Department begins Sunday 
afternoon, June 30, and closes Wednesday afternoon, July 31, 1889. 



FIFTH SCHOOL YEAR, 1889-90. 



Fall Term 



Begins Wednesday afternoon, September 4, 188!). 
Ends Friday evening, December 20, 1889. 



winter vacation. 



Winter Term 



! 



Begins Thursday morning, January 2, 1890. 
Ends Friday evening, March 2S, 1890. 



spring vacation. 



Spring Term 



Begins Tuesday morning, April 8, 1890. 
Commencement Exercises, Tuesday even'g, June 10, 1890. 



N. B. The Calendar is liable to change. 



OFFICERS. 



President, 
Rev. DAVID ALLEN REED. 

Vice-President, 
Rev. J. H. VINCENT, D. D. 



Recording Secretary. 
Rev. S. L. MERRELL. 
Corresponding Secretary. 
OLIVER C. MORSE. 



Treasurer, CHARLES MARSH. 



CORPORATION* 



Hon. J. S. Maclean, Halifax, N. S. 
Hon. S. H. Blake, Toronto, Ontario. 

D. A. Budge, Montreal, Quebec. 
Geo. Hague, " " 
Jos. Hardie, Selma, Ala. 

H. J. McCoy, San Francisco, Cal. 
Humphrey B. Chamberlin, Denver, Col. 
Chas. A. Jewell, Hartford, Conn. 
Jas. IV. Harle, Atlanta, Ga. 

F. H. Jacobs, Joliet, Ills. 
H. M. Moore, Boston, Mass. 
Russell Sturgis, Jr., Boston, Mass. 

E. P. Bagg, Holyoke, Mass. 

E. A. Reed, D. D., Holyoke, Mass. 
Rev. T.IV. Bishop, Salem, Mass. 
Herbert E. Hill, East Somerville, Mass. 
Julius H. Appleton, Springfield, Mass. 
Thomas M. Balliet, " 
Chas. H. Barrows, " 
H. H. Bowman, 

H. M. Brewster, " '* 

S. G. Buckingham, D. D., " " 
T. L. Chapman, M. D., " " 
6". F. Chester, " 
E. Porter Dyer, " " 

George A. Ellis, " " 

N. W. Fisk, 

T. L. Haynes, " " 

G. B. Holbrook, 

Edward Ingersoll, " 
J. L. Johnson, " 
Henry S. Lee, " 
Chas. Marsh, " " 

Rev. S. L. Merrell, 



Homer Merriam, Springfield, Mass. 
Arthur G. Merriam, " " 
Chas. F. Meserve, " 
A. J. Pease, " " 

Rev. S. Hartwell Pratt, " 
Rev. David Allen Reed. " 

E. C. Rogers, " " 
H. C. Rowley, " 
Horace Smith, " 

L. C. Smith, " " 

C. H. Soulhworth, " 
T. H. Stock, 
H. P. Stone, 
G. W. Tapley, 

C. E. Dyer, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Thos. Cochran, Jr., St. Paul, Minn. 
Frank L. Johnston, St. Louis, Mo. 
Jacob C. Denise, M. D., Omaha, Neb. 
Frank. L . Janeway, New Brunswick, N. J. 
Jno.'H. Vincent, D. D., Plainfield, N. J. 

F. IV. Taylor, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Cephas Brainerd, New York City. 
Cleveland H. Dodge, New York City. 
Robert R. McBurney, " " " 

C L. Mead, 

Elbert B. Monroe. " " " 
Wm. S. Sloan, 

Edmund P. Piatt, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

S. F. Scovil, D. D. Wooster, O. 

T. DeJVilt Cuyler, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nelson F. Evans, Philadelphia, Pa. 

J. J. Estey, Brattleboro, Vt. 

Geo. J. Rogers, Milwaukee, Wis. 



*The Trustees are italicized. 



5 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE : 

Henry S. Lee, J. H. Appleton, C. H. Southworth, S. F. Chester, 
with the Officers, ex officio. 

auditors : 

E. C. Rogers, E. Porter Dyer, H. S. Lee. 



the design of the school. 
The specific design of this School is "To train young men for the duties 
of General Secretaries and Gymnasium Instructors in Young Men's 
Christian Associations, and of Sunday School Workers and Pastors' 
Helpers." 

In no sense does it offer a short road to the ministry, or encroach upon 
the sphere of the theological seminary. 



the control. 

The control of this School is vested in a Board of Trustees, of whom 
four, with the officers ex officio, constitute an Executive Committee. 

The Trustees are chosen by the Corporation. The Instructors are ap- 
pointed by the Trustees. 



INSTRUCTORS IN THE GENERAL COURSE. 



Rev. D. A. REED, 734 State Street, 
O. C. MORSE, Ingersoll Grove, 

Systematic Bible Truth and Ethics. 
Rev. T. H. HAWKS, D. D., 626 Worthington Street, 

Bible History, Exegesis, and Church History. 
Rev. S. L. MERRELL, 144 Buckingham Street, 

Rhetoric and Logic. 
Rev. E. P. ARMSTRONG, 60 Sherman Street. 

Vocal Music. 
JOSEPH T. HERRICK, M. D., 684 State Street, 
LUTHER GULICK, M. D., 63 Clarendon Street, 

Physiology and Hygiene. 
R. J. ROBERTS, 73 Sherman Street, 

Gymnasium Work. 



INSTRUCTORS IN THE SPECIAL SCHOOLS. 



the young men's christian association training school : 
Secretarial Department, J. T. BOWNE, 35 Clarendon Street. 

Gymnasium \ LUTHER GULICK, M. D., 63 Clarendon Street, 
Department, ) R. J. ROBERTS, 73 Sherman Street. 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORKERS AND PASTORS' HELPERS. 

Rev. E. P. ARMSTRONG, 60 Sherman Street. 

For Instructors in Summer School, see last pages of Catalogue. 



STUDENTS, 1888-9. 



Note. — Those Marked (S. S.) are in the Training School for Sunday-School Workers and 
Pastors' Helpers. Those marked (Sec.) or (Gym.) are in the Secretarial or in the Gymnasium 
Department of the Y. M. C. A. Training School. 



SENIORS. 
Canfield, James Edward, (Sec.) 
Carruthers, Frederick Fayette, (Sec. 
Colton, Oscar Clement, (Sec.) 
Cook, John Wesley, (Sec.) 
Fowler, Peter Van Benschoten, (Sec. 
French, Archibald Dey, (Sec.) 
*Hatch, Walter Livingstone, (Sec.) 
Horton, Clarence Wesley, (Sec.) 
*Lotze, William George, (Sec.) 
Maxwell, Thomas, (S. S.) . 
*McLeod, Alexander William, (Sec.) 
Muntz, Emanuel, (Gym.) 
Powlison, Charles Ford, (Sec.) 
Robinson, Alexander, (S. S.) 
Solley, George William, (S. S.) 
Thompson, Hugh Currie, (Gym.) 
Wyman, William Hutchinson, (Sec.) 

Allen, Lewis Warren, . 
Iskiyan, Paul Stipan, 



Special. 



. Rondout, N. Y. 
Lincoln, Neb. 
. Bellefontaine, Ohio. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Hopewell Junction, N. Y. 

Montclair, N. J. 
Birmingham, Ala. 

Rome, N. Y. 
Springfield, Mass. 
. Belfast, Ireland. 
New Glasgow, Nova Scotia. 

. Buffalo, N. Y. 
. Plainfield, N. J. 
Hopewell, Nova Scotia. 

Bethel, Conn. 
. Buffalo, N. Y. 

. Elgin, Ills. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Marash, Asiatic Turkey. 



JUNIORS. 

Baker, George Douglas, (Sec.) .... Newton, Iowa. 

Baker, Joseph Herbert, (S. S.) . . . . Franklin, Mass. 

Ball, William Henry, Jr., (Sec.) .... Yonkers, N. Y. 



^Studied only a part of the year. 



8 



Banning, George Wheelock, (Gym.) 
*Barckley, Robert G., (Sec.) 
Barrett, Stephen Edwin, (Sec.) 
*Bartlett, Edward Orville, (Sec.) . 
Carey, Frederick Missimer, (Sec.) . 
Carson, Albert Thompson, (Sec.) 
*Casterline, Archie Foster, (Sec.) . 
Cree, Thomas Kirby, Jr., (Sec.) 
Crippen, James Butterworth, (Sec.) 
Daum, William Fletcher, (Sec.) 
Dickson, Henry David, (Sec.) 
Dinsmore, Martin Luther, (Sec.) 
Donaldson, William John, (Sec.) 
*Douglas, Alonzo P., (Sec.) 
Edwards, James Henry, (Sec.) . 

FlLLEBROWN, HERBERT MARTIN, (Sec.) 

Fleming, Evrett Thomas, (Sec.) 
Flindt, Albert Edward, (Sec.) . 
Ford, George Lyman, Jr., (S. S.) 
Fuller, Frank Averill, (S. S.) 
Haas, Gustav, (Sec.) , 
Hayes, William Solomon, (Sec.) 
Honigh, Jacob Cornelius, (S. S.) 
*Horlacher, Louis A., (Sec.) 
Jacobsen, Carl Martin, (S. S.) 
Jones, Alfred Kirk, (Gym.) 
Locher, William Walter, (Sec.) 
*March, Leonard Guy, (S. S.) . 
Marshall, Fraser Grant, (Sec.) 
*Matheson, George Gordon, (S. S.) 
McCay, Nicholas Craig, (Sec.) . 
Merwin, Milton Knapp, (Sec.) . 
Meyer, Frederick Winfield, (Sec.) . 



New Britain, Conn. 
Burlington, N. J. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Amsterdam, N. Y. 
Pottstown, Pa. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Hornellsville, N. Y. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Coldwater, Mich. 
. Evansville, Ind. 
. Buffalo, N. Y. 
. Yonkers, N. Y. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Omaha, Neb. 
. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Boston, Mass. 
Erie, Pa. 
. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
. Syracuse, N. Y. 
Thomaston, Conn. 
New York, N. Y. 
Watertown, N. Y. 
Pictou, Nova Scotia. 
Dayton, Ohio. 
Arendahl, Norway. 
Burlington, Iowa. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Bridgewater, Dak. 
New Glasgow, N. S. 
Pictou, Nova Scotia. 
Appleton, Wis. 

Utica, N. Y. 
Baltimore, Md. 



^Studied only a part of the 



year. 



9 



Moody, Fred Stowell, (Gym.) .... New Haven, Conn. 
Murray, Murdoch Kenzie, (Sec.) . . Plainfield, Nova Scotia. 
*Nason, Fred Alphonso, (Sec.) .... New Haven, Conn. 
Owen, William Thomas, (Gym.) .... Chester, N. H. 
Parker, Anson Lindsley, (Sec.) .... Detroit, Mich. 
Parks, Will Stewart, (Sec.) .... Brownsville, Tenn. 

Pierson, Fred Jesse, (Sec.) Flint, Mich. 

Plummer, Paul, (Gym.) , Boston, Mass. 

Selleck, Herbert Leroy, (Sec.) .... Utica, N. Y. 

Sprague, Douglas, (Sec.) Toronto, Ont. 

Willmarth, Kobert Irving, (Gym.) .... Deerfleld, N. Y. 

Withrow, John Graham, (Sec.) Harrisburg, Pa. 

*Wood, Newell A., (Sec.) Champlain, N. Y. 

*Younger, Albert, (Sec.) New York, N. Y. 

Special JGottfring, Frederic William, (Sec.) Milwaukee, Wis. 

*-*Younger, Clarmont Henry, (Sec. ) New York, N. Y. 



*Studied only a part of the year. 
For Students in Summer School, 1888, see last pages. 



THE GENERAL COURSE OF INSTRUCTION 



Is common to all the students. It covers two years, and includes the 
following topics : 

The Bible ; 

Systematic Bible Truth ; 
Evidences of Christianity ; 
Christian Ethics ; 
Church History ; 
Methods of Work, etc. ; 
Rhetoric and Logic ; 
Bules for Deliberative Bodies ; 
Vocal Music ; 

Physiology and Hygiene with systematic exercise in the Gym- 
nasium. 

THE BIBLE. 

Junior Year. 
Biblical History (O. T.)j 
The Life of Christ ; 
History of the Apostolic Church ; 
Biblical Geography and Chronology. 

Senior Year. 

Exegesis, Selections from the Psalms and Prophets ; 
The Old Testament Canon ; 

Exegesis in Harmony of the Gospels and Epistles ; 

The English Versions ; 

Introduction. 

Text-Books : Dr. Smith's Old and New Testament Histories (Harper's 
Students' Series); Robinson's English Harmony of the Gospels. 

SYSTEMATIC BIBLE TRUTH, ETC. 

Junior Year — First Term. 

Outline Study of the Evidences of Christianity, of Ethics and of the 
Fundamental Doctrines common to all evangelical denominations. 

Junior Year — Second and Third Terms. 

Study of the Books of the Bible, with reference to the following topics: 
(1) The great divisions of each book ; (2) the great historical facts ; (3) 



11 



the great religious facts and spiritual truths ; (4) the great characters ; 
(5) the great types and their development in the other books ; (6) the 
great prophecies and promises, and their fulfillment ; (7) practical les- 
sons. Special attention will be paid, all through this course, to the great 
doctrines previously studied in outline, as they are developed in each 
book. 

Senior Year — First Term. 

Christian Ethics. 

Senior Year — Second and Third Terms. 
The Books of the Bible, including the Authorship, Aim, General 
Divisions and Leading Facts, Truths, Prophecies and Characters of each 
of the books studied. 

THE HISTORY OF EVANGELICAL CHRISTIANITY. 

Senior Year. 

The attempt is made to obtain a knowledge in outline, of the progress 
of Christianity and the Church down to the present time, prominence 
being given to Missions and the development of doctrine. 

Text-Book : Fisher's History of the Christian Church. 

METHODS OF WORK, ETC. 

Under the following heads, receive special attention throughout the entire 
course : The prayer meeting and its methods ; How to study and use the 
Bible ; How to deal with (Inquirers ; The Worker's Training Class ; 
The Literary Society. 

RHETORIC AND LOGIC. 

Rhetoric is taught during the Junior, and Logic during the Senior 
year. Written compositions are required of all, once in three weeks 
during the entire course. 

Text-Book in Rhetoric : A Manual of Composition and Rhetoric by Jno. 
S. Hart, L. L. D. (Eldridge & Bro., Philadelphia.) 

RULES FOR DELIBERATIVE BODIES 

Will be taught during the Senior year. Manual, Roberts' "Rules of 
Order." 



12 



VOCAL MUSIC, 

To prepare the student to lead in devotional singing, is taught during 
both years. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE, 

With especial reference to the care and development of the body and 
mind. 

Text-Book : Martin's " Human Body." (Briefer Course.) 



The need of a student to take any given studies must be decided by the 
instructors ; but all are required to practice original composition, and 
extempore speaking. 

The general course of study is meant to be adapted to the average stu- 
dent. If any should find a part of the course needless because of previous 
studies and discipline, they will be expected to give themselves to a more 
thorough acquaintance with the remaining departments, and to pass an 
examination upon the entire course. 

Each accepted student, who has not already done so, is advised to read 
carefully in advance of his coming, The Student's Manual," by Rev. 
John Todd. 



ONE YEAR'S COURSE FOR COLLEGE MEN. 

A one year's course has been arranged for 1889-90 especially for college 
students, embracing in the general course : — Bible History, Systematic 
Bible Truth, Exegesis and Church History; and the special work of the 
department which he enters. 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION TRAINING SCHOOL. 



The Secretarial Department. 



Object : Training for the special duties of the General Secretaryship 
of the Young Men's Christian Association. 

DEPARTMENT COURSE OF STUDY * 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Division — The Field, Objects and History. 

J. — The Field and its Limits. — (A) The work— why needed; (B) A defi- 
nite work — for and by young men; (C) The work distinctively re- 
ligious; (D) Relation to the Church. 

II. — Summary of the Objects and Work. — (A) The means employed in 

cities; (B) The means employed in small towns. 

III. — History of the Rise and Growth of the Institution. 

Second Division — The Organization and its Home. 

I. — Organization. — (A) When and how to organize; (B) Practical hints. 

II. — The Constitution. 

III. — Branches and Sub-Organizations. 

IV. — The Management. — (A) The directors; (B) The officers. 

V. — Standing Committees.— {A) Importance, enlistment and composition; 

(B) How to organize, etc.; (C) Principles and methods of construc- 
tion; (D) Names and duties. 

VI. — Membership. — (A) Classes of membership; (B) How to secure mem- 
bers; (C) The membership committee; (D) How to retain members; 
(E) Miscellaneous. 

VII. — Membership continued. — (A) The development of active members; 
(B) The associate membership and its relations; (C) The member's 
meeting, or reception. 

IX. — The General Secretary. His Relationships. — (A) To churches and 
pastors ; (B) To officers, directors and committees; (C) To other em- 
ployes; (D) To the members; (E) To the religious work; (F) To the 
business community; (G) To his fellow secretaries. 



*This is in addition to the General Course outlined on pp. 10-12. 



14 



X. — The General Secretary. Personal Hints. 

XL — Securing and Training Secretaries. — (A) Demand and supply; 

(B) Methods of training. 

XII. — The Association Home. — (A) Tenure. Advantages of owning a 
building; (B) Location; (C) Arrangement; (D) Equipment. 

XIII. — The Care of the Home. — (A) General principles; (B) Repairs; 

(C) Safety; (D) Order and cleanliness. 

XIV. — How to get a Building. — (A) Preparatory work; (B) Plan of a 
canvass; (C) Hints and cautions. 

XV. — The Building Movement. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

THIRD DIVISION. — METHODS OF WORK. 

I. — Current Finances.— (A) Ways and means; 1, Annual budget; 2, 

Sources of income; 3, Solicitation; (B) Collections and disburse- 
ments; (C) Financial bookkeeping. 

II. — Real Estate and Endowment Funds. — (A) Incorporation ; (B) Trus- 

tees; (C) Endowments; (D) Debt, taxes, etc. 

III. — Records and Public Presentation of the Work. — (A) Records and 
statistics; (B) Anniversaries; (C) The parlor conference; (D) Printed 
matter. 

IV. — Information and Belief . — (A) Boarding houses; (B) The employment 
bureau; (C) Visiting the sick; (D) Destitute young men. 

V. — The Bible in Association Work. — (A) Individual Study ; purpose, 

methods, helps; (Bj Class study; 1, For beginners in Christian life ; 
2, For Christian young men in general ; 3, The Workers' training 
class; (C) Practical use with the unconverted; 1, Personal work — 
the inquirer; 2, The evangelistic Bible class; 3, The evangelistic 
meeting; a, scripture quotations; b, Bible song service; c, Topical 
talks; d, Bible readings. 

VI. — Religious Meetings, etc. — (A) The young men's meeting; (B) Other 
meetings at the rooms; (C) Religious work outside the rooms. 

VII. — The Intellectual Department. 

VIII. — The Social Department. 

IX. — The Physical Department. 

X. — Work Among Boys. 



15 



XI. — Work Among Special Classes. — (A)College Students; (B) Railroad 
men; (C) Commercial travelers ; (D) Other nationalities; (E) Miscel- 
laneous classes. 

XII. — Women's Work for Young Men. 

FOURTH DIVISION. — THE GENERAL WORK. 

I. — District Work. 

II. — State and Provincial Work. 

III. — The International Work in North America. 
, IV. — The World's Committee and its Work. 

Text-Book : "Hand book of the History, Organization and Methods of 
Work of Young Men's Christian Associations." This book was prepared 
especially for the use of this department. 



College Men who enter for the " One Year's Course" outlined on page 
12 can in the same time cover the work of this department. 



PRACTICE. 

During the whole of the Junior Year, all students in this department 
are required to be members of the Armory Hill Association, which occu- 
pies rooms in the School building; to do regular practical work on one or 
more of its standing committees; and to attend all stated meetings of the 
committees to which appointed, and the regular sessions of the Training 
Class. During the Senior Year the same must be done in connection 
with the Central Association — unless the student is preparing especially 
for Railroad work, when he will be required to unite and work with the 
Railroad Association. All are given practice in preparing monthly re- 
ports of committees, minutes of meetings, items for newspapers and bul- 
letins, printers' copy, and proof reading; and are expected to attend each 
year at least two Association Conventions. The instructors decline to 
grant leave of absence to attend conventions other than those prescribed 
in the Department Course. 



SPECIAL LECTURES AND CONFERENCES, 



In the Secretarial Department, in 1888-89. 

1. Oct. 16, 1888.— Luther D. Wishard, College Secretary of the 
World's Central Committee. " Association Work in Heathen Lands." 

2. Oct. 16. — F. K. Sanders, Secretary International Committee. " As- 
sociation Work in Jaffna, Ceylon." 

3. Oct. 24. — David Walker, General Secretary, Sydney, New South ■ 
Wales. " Association Work in the Australian Colonies." 

4. Nov. 27. — H. Thane Miller of Cincinnati, Ohio. " Hindrances to 
Usefulness in the Secretaryship." 

5. Nov. 27. — Robert Weidensall, Secretary of the International 
Committee. " The Opportunities of the General Secretaryship." 

6. Dec. 3. — H. F. Williams, Secretary of the International Commit- 
tee. " The Railway Work and Our Relation to It." 

7. Jan. 22, 1889— S. H. Berry, Librarian of the Brooklyn, N., Y., As- 
sociation. " Why the Association should have a Library, and how it may 
be made most useful." 

8. Jan. 29.— E. Porter Dyer, Editor of The Springfield Union, " The 
Secretary and the Newspapers; with hints on taking notes." 

9. Jan. 30. — Rev. George A. Hall, State Secretary of New York. 
" Some things which I have learned both in and out of the Secretary- 
ship." 

10. Jan. 30. — Thomas K. Cree, Secretary of the International Com- 
mittee. " Impressions of Association Work Abroad." 

11. Feb. 5. — D. F. More, State Secretary of New Jersey. "Some of 
the ways in which the State and Local Secretaries may co-operate with 
each other." 

12. March 5. Ex-Mayor Frederick Fosdick, of Fitchburg, Mass. 
" Business Principles applied to Religious Work." 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION TRAINING SCHOOL. 



The Gymnasium Department. 

Object : Training for the special duties of Gymnasium Instructors. 



DEPARTMENT COURSE OF STUDY.* 

Note.— The following courses will be carried out as far as possible. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Anatomy: Lectures and study from charts and models. 
Physiology: Martin's "Human Body." 

Lectures: Effects of Exercise; Baths and Bathing; Personal Purity; 
How to Take Measurements. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Physiology : Text Books — Foster; Landois and Sterling. 

Anatomy: Text Books — Gray; Quain. Study on Models. 

Physical Diagnosis: Lectures. Text Books — Loomis; Hudson; 'Flint. 

Effects and Prescription of Exercise. 

Anthropometry. 

Lectures on and Reviews of: " How to Get Strong," Blaikie; "Sound 
Bodies," Blaikie ; " New Gymnastics," Bio Lewis ; "Physi- 
cal Culture," D. L. Bowd ; "Health by Exercise," Geo. 
Taylor; "Systematic Training," Schaible; Gymnastic Litera- 
ture in General. 



•This is in addition to the General Course outlined on pp. 10-12. 



GYMNASTIC AND ATHLETIC EXERCISE. 



Special attention will be given to the building up of the weak parts of 
the student, and the development of a strong, erect, symmetrical and 
graceful figure. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Sixty lessons will be given in elementary exercises and drills, with and 
without apparatus ; calisthenics ; dumb-bells ; wands ; mats ; parallel 
bars ; horse ; buck ; etc. These exercises will be adapted to a class 
just beginning gymnasium work. 

Forty lessons will be given in more advanced work, but not beyond the 
range of an ordinary class. 

Sixty lessons in the practice of the simpler outdoor exercises, running, 
jumping, swimming, etc. 

Twenty lessons in the actual leading of classes, under supervision. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Lessons in out door exercises, taking up more especially the sports, 
lawn tennis, foot ball, etc. 

Forty lessons in the more advanced gymnastic work, such as would be 
beyond the reach of the ordinary class. 

Twenty exercises in actual leading of classes, under supervision. 

No exercises of a hazardous nature will be taught. 

The examinations will be a practical test of ability in the execution of 
the exercises that have been taught. 

College Men who enter for the " One Year's Course " outlined on page 
12, can in the same time cover the work of this department. 

During the whole of this special course, which covers two years, all 
students in this department are required to be members of one of the 
local Young Men's Christian Associations, to do practical work on one 
or more of its standing committees, and to attend all stated meetings of 
the committees to which appointed, and the regular sessions of the School 
Training Class. They will also be expected to attend each year at least 
two District, State or International Conventions. The instructors de- 
cline to grant leave of absence to attend conventions other than those 
prescribed in the Department Course. 

For Summer Session of this department, see pages 28-35. 



TRAINING SCHOOL 

FOR 

SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORKERS AND PASTORS' HELPERS. 



Object : The training of young men for the duties of Sunday-school 
Missionaries and Superintendents, and Pastors' Helpers. 



DEPARTMENT COURSE OF INSTRUCTION.* 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Term. 

I. Historical and Theoretical. 

A. Aim and Scope of the Sunday-School. 

B. History, including (1) Authority; (2) Origin; (3) Growth 

and Progress; (4) Union Work; (5) Denominational Work; 
(6) Its future. 

C. Plan. 1. Church and School: ( 1) Their Relations; (2) Mis- 

sion Schools; (8) Place; (4) Time and Finance; (5) Library. 
2. Organization: (1) Constitution; (2) Officers and Commit- 
tees; (3) Grades and Classes; (4) Home Department. 

II. Practical and Normal. • 

1. Bible: Books, characters, geography, constitution. 

2. Lesson Study. 

3. Frontier Work. 

4. Methods of Teaching. 



*This is in addition to the General Course outlined on pp. 10-12. 



20 



Second Term. 

C. Plan (Continued). 

3. Conventions: (1) Conferences; (2) Unions; (3) Institutes; 
(4) Local, District, County, State, International, Denomi- 
national Conventions; (5) Assemblies; (6) Associations: 
State, County, Town and District. 

D. Work. 1. Gathering in: (1) Canvassing; (2) Work by Child- 

ren; (3) By Committees; (4) By Superintendents; (5) On 
the Frontier. 

2. Order of exercises. 

3. Officers: (1) Qualifications; (2) Duties. 

4. Teachers: (1) Qualifications; (2) Duties; (3) Selection 

and Removal; (4) Preparation; (5) Week-day Work; (6) 
Before the Class; (7) Personal Work. 

Third Term. 

5. Matter to teach: (1) International Lesson; (2) Supple- 

mental Lesson ; (3) Music; (4) Prayer; (5) Benevolence; 
(6) Reviews. 

6. Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor: (1) Rela- 

tion to Sunday-school and Church; (2) Organization and 
Methods; (3) Needs and Benefits. 

7. Concerts, Picnics, Excursions, Fairs, Prizes, Mottoes, 

Festivals, Socials, Receptions, Vacations, Anniversa- 
ries, etc. 

II. Practical and Normal (Continued). 

Second Term. Third Term. 

5. Teachers' Meetings. 7. Object Teaching. 

6. Blackboard Teaching. 8. Supplemental Lessons. 

9. Normal Methods. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term. 
I. Historical and Theoretical. 

1. Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor (Continued). 

2. History of Education. 

3. Study of Child Mind. 

4. Lives of Eminent Teachers.. 

5. Principles of Teaching. 



21 



II. Practical and Normal. 

1. Prayer Meetings: Boys', Children's, Young Men's, Young 

Women's, Teachers', Missionary, Temperance. 

2. Praise Meetings. 

3. Reports. 

Second Term. 
I. Historical and Theoretical (Concluded). 

1. The Church: (1) Organization; (2) Management; (3) Officers. 

2. Pastor's Helper: (1) Place; (2) Duties; (3) Qualifications. 

3. Pastoral Work. 

4. Mission Work. 

Third Term. 

5. Training Classes. 

6. Committee Work. 

7. Printed Matter. 

II. Practical and Normal (Concluded). 

Second Term. Third Term. 

1. Gospel Meetings. 3. Training Classes. 

2. Bible Readings. 4. Records and Reports. 

5. Printing. 

Text Books: The Young Teacher, Groser; Teaching and Teachers, 
Trumbull; Seven Laws of Teaching, Gregory; The Sunday-School Library, 
Dunning; The Life of Robert Raikes, Lloyd; Normal Outlines, Hurlbut. 



N. B. Each Student in this School is expected to connect himself, ff 
possible, with a Sunday-School of his own denomination in this city, and 
work in it. 

N. B. The special aim of this Training School is to combine, for the 
best practical results, the Theory and Drill of the course with the Actual 
Work done outside, under the inspection and counsel of the Instructor 
who is, at the same time Superintendent of one of the largest Sunday- 
Schools in New England. 



SPECIAL LECTURES. 



IN THE TRAINING SCHOOL FOK S. S. WORKERS AND PASTORS' HELPERS, 

1888-89. 

1. " Methods of Sunday-School Work on the Frontier." 

Rev. Geo. H. Griffin, Secretary for New England of the Ameri- 
can Sunday-School Union. 

2. "Moral and Religions Teaching." 

A Series of Four Lectures by Prof. Thomas M. Balliet, Super- 
intendent of Schools, Springfield, Mass. 

3. The Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor." 

Rev. F. E. Clark, Editor of The Golden Rule and" President of 
the National C. E. Society. 

4. " City Evangelization." 

Rev. A. G. Lawson, D. D., Secretary of the "Baptist Social 
Union," Boston, Mass. 

5. " Work of the Salaried Superintendent." 

Rev. J. W. Cooper, D. D., Pastor South Congregational Church, 
New Britain, Conn. 

6. " Sabbath-School and Mission Work." 

A Series of Three Lectures by Rev. J. A. Worden, D. D., Phila- 
delphia, Penn., Superintendent of the Sabbath-School and 
Missionary Work of the Presbyterian Church. 

7. " Conventions, Conferences and Associations." 

Mr. W. H. Hall, Secretary of the Connecticut Sunday-School 
Association, and Member of the International Sunday-School 
Committee. 

8. " Work of the Sunday-School Missionary." 

Mr. J. Lindley Spicer, Missionary of the American Sunday- 
School Union and Agent of the Union's Depository in New 
York. 

9. " Office and Duties of the Pastor's Helper." 

Mr. W. H. Swallow, Helper to the Pastor of the State Street 
Baptist Church in Springfield, Mass. 



TERMS OF ADMISSION, ETC. 



The School for Christian Workers is open only to Christian young men, 
over eighteen years of age, who have already sliown ability in the direc- 
tion of the work for which they wish to prepare. 

Each applicant for admission shall give evidence of having had at 
least a fair English education. If a graduate of a college or high school, 
he shall, upon entering, show his certificate of graduation; if not, he 
must before he can be accepted, pass a brief preliminary examination. 
Particulars of this will be sent upon the return of the application blank. 

Business experience is very desirable. 

Each applicant shall be a member in good standing of an evangelical 
church, and if admitted shall bring a certificate to this effect from his 
pastor, and unite with some church of his choice in this city. 

Each applicant shall fill out and return "Confidential" blank, No. 1 — 
which is sent to every applicant for information — giving at least two ref- 
erences as to character and qualifications. With this returned blank, in 
order to defray the expense of investigation, must be enclosed, if in the 
United States, twenty cents in postage stamps; if from Canada, twenty- 
four cents in Canadian stamps; and if from other Postal Union countries, 
the equivalent of forty cents in the stamps of the country from whence 
the application comes. Several weeks are sometimes required in making 
a thorough investigation, hence the desirability of making application as 
early as possible. Only after satisfactory reports are received concern- 
ing him can any student be admitted to the School. 

The School year begins with the first Wednesday in September. Stu- 
dents who enter for one year, or the course, will not be admitted after 
the last of October. Those who can enter for a few months only, are ad- 
mitted at any time; but nothing aside from the regular work is promised 
to such. It will be greatly to the advantage of all to enter at the begin- 
ning of the year. 

Too much emphasis cannot be laid upon the importance of taking the 
entire course, wherever it is possible. 

Each shall pledge himself upon the books of the School to comply with 
all its rules and the requirements of the officers, and shall give at least 
one week's notice if for any reason he wishes to leave the School before 
the end of the year. 

Each is received upon probation, and when it becomes clearly evident 
that the pre-requisites for success are wanting, he will no longer be re- 
tained in the School. 

It should be distinctly understood that neither the School nor its in- 
structors agree to find places for students upon their leaving. 



ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES. 

For the School Year of Forty Weeks. 



The following estimate of expenses is based upon the experience of 



The above estimate covers only the items specified, and not 
other necessary incidentals which each must calculate for 
himself. There are no extras. 

The expenses of transients vary from $6.00 to $7.00 per week. 

Only forty-four students can be lodged in the present building, and 
rooms are assigned as the students are accepted. Furnished rooms out- 
side the building cost from $1.25 to $2.00 per week ; table board, from 
$3.25 to $4.00 per week. 

Tuition is payable promptly on the last Mondays in September and 
January, one-half at each payment. Room rent, on last Mondays in each 
month. No reduction of rent will be made to a student who engages a 
room and fails to appear at the specified time nor to one who vacates his 
room less than a month before the close of the School. A deposit of 
twenty-five cents will be required for each key to the entrance of the 
Gymnasium. 

Students will save themselves trouble and expense by bringing ex- 
change on New York and Boston banks rather than local checks. 

Where students have undertaken to pay a part of their expenses, by 
engaging in work in the city during the school year, they have found in 
every instance that it seriously interfered with their studies. 



1888-9: 



Table board, • 

Furnished room, in Building, with light and heat, 
Tuition, ...... 

Gymnasium dress, .... 

Washing, about ..... 

Text and Note Books, .... 

Attendance upon Conventions, 



from $130 to $140 



40 40 

40 40 

4 " 6 

12 " 16 

12 " 20 

14 " 18 



$252 to $280 



For expenses in Summer School see page 34. 



ROOMS. 



Each student lodging in the building will care for his own room, which 
must be kept scrupulously clean. He will be expected to provide sheets, 
pillow and bolster slips, towels and soap. Beds are all single, 3 feet in 
width; pillows, 18x26 inches; bolsters, 18x36 inches. Rooms are liable 
to weekly inspection. Rent will continue until the room is vacated and 
the key delivered to the superintendent of the building. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION. 



A student desiring to enter upon the regular Senior course, must 
first pass the examinations of the Junior course and be recommended 
for promotion by the superintendent of the special department to which 
he belongs. 

A student who completes the general and either of the department 
courses, or an equivalent (passing seventy per cent, in his examinations 
upon the whole) and is recommended for graduation by the superinten- 
dent of the special department to which he belongs, will receive a di- 
ploma. This will include the students who complete the One Year's 
Course; page 12. One who does not complete the course, can have a cer- 
tificate setting forth the amount and character of the work done by him, 
if he desires it, by application to the Recording Secretary. 



LOCATION. 



Springfield is the metropolis of Western Massachusetts. It has about 
forty thousand inhabitants, while it is the rival in wealth and commercial 
influence of cities many times greater, and its manufactures are famed 
the world over. 

It is a railroad centre easily accessible from every direction. Lying on 
the great thoroughfares from Boston to New York, from Boston to Albany 



4 



26 

and the West, from Montreal to New York, and in the midst of a densely 
populated manufacturing region, more than a hundred passenger trains 
daily bring in or bear away their living freight. 

Springfield is in one of the most delightful parts of the charming Con- 
necticut valley. Itself beautiful for its public edifices and private dwell- 
ings, its streets, parks, lawns and trees — it is a beautiful gem in a more 
beautiful setting. 

It combines the advantages of the city and the country. It has a large 
and increasing public library and reading-room, in a building which 
would be an honor to any city. Its common and high schools are seldom 
surpassed. It has a large population of active Christians who worship 
in edifices, some of which have a national reputation for architectural 
beauty. There is a degree of intellectual, social, moral and religious ear- 
nestness which is seldom found except in the great centres of population. 

The site of the building for The School for Christian Workers is on 
Armory Hill, in a part of the city which is attracting much attention for 
its healthfulness. It is near the head of State Street, a broad and beau- 
tiful avenue, and has the combined advantages of easy access to the cen- 
tre of the city with its privileges, and of nearness to the open country. 
The friends of the School think that no better place could have been 
chosen for such an institution. 

The Armory Hill horse cars (with yellow dash-boards) pass the Union 
Station, running directly to the School. 



FOR GENERAL INFORMATION 

Concerning the School or its finances, apply to O. C. Morse, Correspond- 
ing Secretary, School for Christian Workers, Springfield, Mass. 



FOR SPECIAL INFORMATION 

Concerning the work of the departments, address as follows, at Spring- 
field, Mass.: 

Y. M. C. A. TRAINING SCHOOL, 
Secretarial Department.— J. T. Bowne, 35 Clarendon Street. 
Gymnasium Department. — Luther Gulick, M. D., 63 Clarendon Street. 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR S. S. WORKERS, 
Rev. E. P. Armstrong, 60 Sherman Street. 



THIRD SUMMER SESSION 

OF THE 

GYMNASIUM DEPARTMENT 

OF THE 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION TRAINING SCHOOL, 
June 30 to July 31, inclusive, 1889. 



INSTRUCTORS. 

Prof. C. S. BEARDSLEY, Hartford Theological Seminary, 

Bible Study. 

LUTHER GULICK, M. D., 

Association Work and Athletics. 

R. J. ROBERTS, 

Gymnastics. 

J. GARDNER SMITH, M. D., Physical Director Harlem Association. 
New York City, 

Physical Diagnosis. 
T. M. BULL, M. D., Physical Director of' Young Men's Institute, New 
York City, 

Physiology and Hygiene. 



SPECIAL LECTURERS. 

W. C. DOUGLAS, General Secretary, Boston, Mass., 

Consecration. 

R. R. McBURNEY, General Secretary, New York City, 

The Development of Workers. 
WM. BLAIKIE, Esq., author of " How to Get Strong." 

Methods of Work for the Advancement of Personal Purity. 
Prof. J. W. SEAYER, M. D., Yale University, New Haven, Conn., 

Physical Training among the Greeks. 
PHEBE SPRAGUE, M. D., Springfield, Mass., 

Precautions to be taken in the Physical Training of Girls. 



STUDENTS OF THE SUMMER SESSION OF 1888. 



Allen, C. H. 
Allen, H. T. 
Barnard, A. W. 
Bartlett, C. W. 
Bartlett,F.H.,M.D. 
Becker, W. S. H. 
Bemies, C. O. 
Bridgman, F. 
Brodhead, H. W. 
Carey, O. W. 
Clark, R. A., A. B., 
Como, E. F. 
Cornelius, Thos. 
Dickinson, W. B. 
Dickinson, W. G. 
Gage, E. F., A. B., 
gwathmey, j. t. 
Haas, Gustav. 
Haven, P. P. 
Havener, L. C. 
Hess, G. W. 
Hodge, H. G. 
Howard, C. F. 
Howe, A. C. 
Ireland, G. D. 
Kennedy, A. 
King, W. J. 

KlNZLEY, L. W. 

Leonard, F. E. 



Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., Troy, N. Y. 

Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., Springfield, 111. 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., Tonawanda, N.Y. 
Physical Director, 325 Broome St., New York City. 



, Physical Director, 23d St. Br., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A.. 

Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 

Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
General Secretary, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Association Training School, 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Asst. Int. Committee's Office, 
Gymnasium Assistant, Y.M.C.A 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Oberlin College, 



New York City. 
Youngs town, O. 
Burlington, la. 
Toledo, O. 
York, Pa. 
Salem, Mass. 
^Jersey City, N. J. 
Middletown, Ct. 
Richmond, Va. 
Albany, N. Y. 
Flint, Mich. 
New Britain, Ct. 

Omaha, Neb. 
Springfield, Mass. 

Bridgeport, Ct. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Auburn, N. Y. 
Springfield, O. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Watertown, N.Y. 
New York City. 
., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Norfolk, Ya. 
Lockport, N. Y. 

Ohio. 



30 



Logan, E. W. 
Leuba, J. H. 
Manning, E. H. 
McCrone, H. W. 
McCurdy, J. H. 
McPhie, D. A. 

MlNTZER, G. W. 

Nerger, L. H. 
Oviatt, B. L., B. S., 
Partridge, G. W. 
Phillips, P.C.,A.B., 
Phillips, C. D. 

SCHLEMMER, W. A. 

Sims, J. W. 
Smith, H. F. 
Sowby, T. T. * 
Welch, E I. 
Whitman, A. H. 
Wikel, H. H. 
Wilder, E. W. 
Yarnell, D. E. 



Physical Director, 
General Secretary, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Physical Director, 
Gymnasium Asst., 



Y. M. C. A., 
French Br., 
Y. M. C. A., 
Y. M. C. A., 
Y. M. C. A., 
Y. M. C. A., 
N. W. Br., 
German Br., 
York vi lie Br. 
Y. M. C. A., 
Y. M. C. A., 
Y. M. C. A., 
Y. M. C. A., 
Y. M. C. A., 
23d St. Br., 



Physical Director, 23d St. Br., 
Physical Director, Y. M. C. A., 
Gymnasium Asst., Y. M. C. A., 
Physical Director, Y. M. 0. A., 
Assistant Secretary, Y. M. L, 



Orange, X. J. 
New York City. 
McKeesport, Pa. 
Columbus, O. 
Lewiston, Me. 
St. John, N. B. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York City. 
New York. 
London, Ont. 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Danville, Pa. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Hartford, Ct. 
New York. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
New York. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Meriden, Ct. 
New York City. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 



BIBLE STUDY, Prof. C. S. Beardsley. 

Consecutive Studies in the Gospels. 

1. Childhood of Jesus. 

a. Annunciation to Mary. 

b. Magnificat of Mary. 

c. Song of Zacharias, Luke 1. 

2. Teachings of John the Baptist, Matt. 3. 

3. Baptism and Temptation, Matt. 3 and 4. 

4. First Chapter of John. 

5. Talk with Nicodemus, John 3. 

6. Scene in Nazareth, Luke 4. 

7. Early Galilean Ministry, Mark 1. 

8. Healing of the Paralytic, Mark 2. 

9. Teachings of Jesus, John 5. 

10. Teachings about the Sabbath, Luke 6. 

11. Sermon on the Mount, Matt. 6 and 7. 

12. Centurion's Servant, Matt. 8. 

13. Matthew 11. 

14. Parables, Matt. 13. 

15. Feeding of the 5,000 and surrounding Events, Matt. 14. 

ASSOCIATEON WORK, .... Luther Gulick, M. D. 
The Young Men's Christian Association: 
Its Organization, Aims and Methods. 

Relation of the Physical Department to the whole work of the 

Association. 
Aim of the Physical Department. 
Association History and lessons from it. 

Relation of the Physical Director to the General Secretary, Gym- 
nasium committee and to the Church. 

Methods of Work: 

Committees, why needed, how selected, trained, duties of, etc. 
Religious work, methods and suggestions. Bible class, Leader's 
class. 

Social and Personal Purity, the facts, and how to meet them. 
Scientific work, why necessary, methods of taking statistics, their 
object, how preserved, and used. 



32 



PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS, ... J. Gardner Smith, M. D. 
Didactic and Clinical Lectures will cover the following subjects: 
Mode and Means of making a Physical Examination. 
Anatomy and Physiology of the Chest. 
Definition and Significance of Sounds and Signs. 
Percussion in Health. 
Percussion in Disease. 
Auscultation in Health. 
Auscultation in Disease. 

Diagnosis of Disease of the Respiratory Organs, and its impor- 
tance in our work. 
Diseases which Gymnastic work may help or harm. 
Physical Conditions of the Heart in Health. 
Physical Conditions of the Heart in Disease. 
Heart Sounds and Cardiac Murmurs. 

Relation of Athletics to the Heart in Health and Disease. 
Other important structures Influenced by Gymnastic Exercise. 
"Heart Burn" and Intestinal Troubles made better or worse by 

Gymnastics ? 
Three Lectures on first aid to the Injured. 
Unconsciousness (Fainting, Apoplexy, etc.) 
Transportation of the Injured, and Bandaging. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE, ... T. M. Bull, M. D. 

The following subjects will be studied with special reference to Physi- 
cal Development. 

Cells: Elements, Proximate Principles. 

Bones, Muscles: Oxidation, Energy, Nutrition. 

Foods: Digestion, Absorption, Assimilation. 

Blood — Heart: Circulation. 

Lungs: Respiration. 

Excretion: Kidneys, Skin. 

Nervous System: Cord, Brain, Sympathetic. 

Senses. 

GYMNASTICS, R. J. Roberts. 

Elementary Gymnastics, on the Horse, Buck, Parallel Bars, Mats, 
Dumb-bells, Calisthenics, etc. 

Especial attention will be given to the art of leading classes, and to 
the building up of a system of Gymnastics on the platform, that 
"All Exercises shall be Safe, Short, Easy, Beneficial and Pleasing." 



6'd 

OUT-DOOR SPORTS, .... Luther Guijck, M. D. 

Instruction in general principles of Training. 
Training, daily, in sprint and long distance running. 
High and broad jumping, both standing and running. 
Swimming, with directions for rescuing from drowning. 
Rowing, Lawn tennis, etc. 

These sports will be studied particularly with relation to their effect 
on the Heart, Lungs, and Abdominal organs 



TERMS OF ADMISSION, ETC. 

Each applicant must be a member in good standing of some Evangeli- 
cal Church. He must fill out and return Confidential Blank, No. 1, giving 
at least two references as to character and qualifications. He must have 
at least a fair English education, and must have shown aptitude for this 
line of Christian work. If found satisfactory, the student will be ad- 
mitted to the School upon the payment of the fees. 

It must be distinctly understood that neither the School, nor its In- 
structors, individually, in any way agree to find positions for its students. 

Any General Secretary desiring to take one or more of the courses, 
will be admitted on application. 



ADMISSION TO ADVANCED CLASSES, ETC 

All students will be expected to take the courses in Bible study and 
Association work. 

Those desiring to take the course in physical diagnosis will be required 
to pass an examination in Martin's " Human Body " (Brief er Course, not 
the Elementary one), and on the Anatomy of the Thorax, as found in 
the edition of 1887 of Gray's Anatomy, pp. 904-915; 927-939, unless ex- 
cused by the Board of Instructors. 

Those desiring to take the course in Out-door Sports will be required 
to pass an examination on Mr. Roberts' system of floor work, unless es- 
pecially excused by the Board of Instructors. Those who have com- 
pleted this course at some previous date will be excused from this 
examination 



EXPENSES. 



The following estimate of expenses is based on the experience of last 
year: 

Table board, from - - - - - - - $17.00 to #20.00 

Koom rent, from - - - - - •- 5.00 to 10.00 

Washing, from -------- 2.50 to 5.00 

Books, etc., from - ' - - - - . - - 6.00 to 10.00 

Tuition, --------- io.00 20.00 

§50.50 $65.00 

The tuition is $20.00 for the month; for a shorter period, a dollar a day 
(payable in advance). 

Rooms in the building will be $5.00 for the course, and will be open 
only to those who desire to take the whole session. The room rent is 
payable in advance. 

The above estimates cover only the items specified, and not other inci- 
dentals, which each must calculate for himself. 



ROOMS. 



Each student lodging in the building must care for his own room. He 
will be expected to provide sheets, pillow and bolster slips, towels and 
soap. Beds are all single, 3 feet in width; pillows, 18 by 26 inches; bol- 
sters, 18 by 36 inches. 

Those desiring to room in the building should apply at once, as there 
are indications that the building will not accommodate all who wish 
to do so. • 

Rooms outside of the building can be secured for from one and a 
quarter to three dollars a week. 



OPENING AND CLOSING EXERCISES. 

The Session will open on Sunday, June 30, with an address on Conse- 
cration, by W. C. Douglas, of Boston, Mass., and this will be followed by 
a meeting of prayer for God's blessing on the School. 



35 



On Monday morning, at nine o'clock, the School will organize, and at 
ten the examinations of those desiring to enter the advanced classes will 
take place. At two o'clock, the regular lectures of the course will 
commence. 

On Wednesday, July 31, at two o'clock, Wm, Blaikie, Esq., will deliver 
an address, and at four the closing exercises of the school will be held. 

All students are urged to reach Springfield by Saturday evening, 
June 29. 



LOCATION, ETC. 

The School is situated within fifteen minutes walk of excellent boat- 
ing and bathing. Boats will be furnished without charge for the class 
work in rowing and swimming. 

Within five minutes' walk of the building are the School athletic 
grounds, having excellent running track, tennis grounds, ball fields, etc. 

The Armory Hill horse cars (with yellow dash boards), pass the Union 
R. R. station, running directly to the School. 

Applications for admission, letters asking for information, etc., should 
be addressed to 

LUTHER GULICK, M. 1)., 

Association Training School, 

Springfield, Mass. 



Ik 








CONTRIBUTIONS. 



concerning the finances will receive immediate attention by 
O. C. Mouse, Corresponding Secretary, School for Christian 
Workers; and remittances may be made to him payable to the order of 
the Treasurer, Charles Mabsh, Cashier Pynchon National Bank, 
Sprinsfiield. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath to The School for Christian Workers, in Springfield, 
Mass., the sum of dollars.* 



BEQUEST FOR ENDOWMENT. 



e and bequeath to The School for Christian Workers, in Springfield, 
a^achusetts, the sum of , to be safely invested by them and 

called the Fund. The interest of this fund to be applied 

to the use of the School.* 




i 



PERPETUAL LOAN FUND. 



For the purpose of founding a perpetual loan fund in The School for 
Christian- Workers (or either of its special schools, if so stated), I hereby 
gr* #the sum of four thousand dollars — or its equivalent in good secur- 
ities at cash value — to be safely invested by them, the income to be loaned 
toward the education of students who have already shown ability in the 
School. 

*Or the testator may specify, towards the current expenses; or, towards the support of a chair 
of instruction in the general course, or in either of the special schools; or, to be used as a loan 
towards the education of students who have shown ability in either of the special schools. 



FIFTH CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

SCHOOL for CHRISTIAN WORKERS, 

Including the Special Work in the Young Men's Christian 
Association Training School, and in the Training 
School for Sunday- School Workers 
and Pastors' Helpers. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



hit UBRARY \it ink 
AFR >) 1351 

IIHIVFPSITY WF 'HINDIS 



CONTENTS. 



Admission, terms of ......... 32 

Bequest, forms for inside back cover 

Calendar for 1890-91 '. 3 

Contributions, how made, etc., .... inside back cover 

Corporation, . . . . . 4 

Design of School for Christian Workers, 5 

Expenses, estimate of 33 

General Course of Instruction, . . . . . . . . 10-13 

Graduation, conditions of . . 34 

Information, how to get it, . . . ... . . 36 

Instructors in the general and special courses, .... 6 

Location of School, . . 35 

Officers, . . . ... . . . . . 5 

Physical Department, special studies and work in 19-24 

Promotion, conditions of . 34 

Rooms and Bedding, . . 34 

Secretarial Department, special studies and work in . . . 14-17 

" " special lectures in 18 

Students for 1889-90, 7-9 

Sunday-School Department, special studies in . . . . 25-27 

" " special lectures in ... . 28 

Training School for S. S. Workers and Pastors' Helpers, . . 25-28 

Tuition and other expenses, 33 

Y. M. C. A. Training School, 14r-24 



FIFTH CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

School for Christian Workers, 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

FOR 1889=90. 

WITH PROSPECTUS FOR 1890-91. 

FEBRUARY, 1890. 



CLARK W. liRYAN & CO., Printkrs, 
Springfield, Mass. 



Organized November ii-~>. 1884. 

INCORPORATED JANUARY 28, 1885. SCHOOL OPENED SEPTEMBER 8, 1885. 




Thia building, erected for the school, cost ,vith land and fiunitu 
$43.4*5.00: is free from debt; contains sleeping accommodations 
for 44 students, recitation rooms, offices for the instructors, 
a large gymnasium, baths, etc., and also a complete 
suite of rooms for the Armory Hill Young 
Men's Christian Association. 



3 



CALENDAR. 



Commencement Exercises and Annual Meeting of the Corporation and 
Board of Trustees, Tuesday, June 10, 1890. 

Quarterly Meetings of the Trustees on the second Fridays of March, 
June, September and December. 

Summer Session of the Physical Department commences the first 
week in August and continues during the month. 



SIXTH SCHOOL YEAR, 1890-91. 



Fat t TpT)« j Begins Wednesday afternoon, September 3, L890. 

| Ends Friday evening, December 19, 1890. 



W I VTER VACATION. 



Wiv i i-i. t. ^m ( Begins Monday morning, January 5, 1891. 
ierm } Ends Friday evening, March 27, i89 1. 



SPRING VACATION. 



C Begins Tuesday morning, April 7, 1891. 
Spring Term {Commencement Exercises, Tuesday evening, June 9, 
( 1891. 

\ . B. The Calendar is liable to change. 



4 



CORPORATION. 



Nova Scotia, Halifax, W. B. MeNutt, 
Ontario, Toronto, Hon. S. H. Blake. 
Quebec, Montreal, D. A. Budge. 

" " George Hague. 
Ala., Selma, Jos. liar die. 
Cal., San Francisco, H. J. McCoy. 
Col., Denver, II. B. Chamberlin. 
Conn., Hartford. Chas. A. Jewell. 
Conn., Meriden, Wm. A. Kelsey. 
Conn., West Hartford, W. H. Hall. 
Ga., Atlanta, Jas. W. Harle. 
Mass., Amherst, Br. Edward Hitchcock. 
Mass., Boston, Rev. Francis E Clark. 
" Chas. A. Hopkins. 
H. 31. Moore. 
" Russell Sturgis. Jr. 

Mass., Campello, Preston B. Keith. 
Mass., Chicopee, Hon. L. E. Hitchcock. 
Mass., Holyoke, E. P. Bagg. 

E. A. Reed, D. D. 
Mass., Salem, Rev. T. W. Bishop. 
Mass., East Somerville, Herbert E. Hill. 
Mass., Springfield, Julius II. Appleton. 

Thomas M. Balliet. 
Chas. H. Barrows. 
" « " H. H. Bowman. 
'• H. M. Brewster. 

S. G. Buckingham, D. D. 
S. F. Chester. 
t; E. Porter Dyer. 
Geo. A. Ellis. 
N.W. Fisk. 
T. L. Haynes. 
G. B. Holbrook. 
Edward Ingersoll. 
J. L. Johnson. 
Henry S.Lee. 
" Chas. Marsh. 

Rev. S. L. Merrell. 
Homer Merriam. 
" Arthur G. Merriam. 
" " Oliver C. IWor.se. 



Mass., Springfield, A. J. Pease. 

" Rev. S. Hartwell Pratt. 
,l " Rev. David Allen Reed. 
" E. C. Rogers. 

H. C. Rowley. 
" Horace Smith. 
" " C. H. Southworth. 

T. H. Stock. 
H. P. Stone. 
G. W. Tapley. 
Mass., Worcester, James Logan. 
Minn., Minneapolis, C. E. Dyer. 
Minn., St. Paul, Thos. Cochran, Jr. 
Mo., St. Louis, Frank L. Johnson. 
Mo., Sedalia, F. H. Jacobs. 
Neb., Omaha, J. C. Denise, M. D. 
N. J., New Brunswick, Frank L. Janeway. 
N. J., Plain field, Jno. H. Vincent. I). I). 
N. J., Summit, Chas. B. Grant. 
N. Y., Addison, Burton G. Win ton. 
N. T., Brooklyn, Edwin F. See. 
N. Y., Buffalo, F. W. Taylor. 
Neiv York City, William Blaikie. 
" " " Cephas Bramerd. 

" Cleveland H. Dodge. 
" " George E. Dodge. 

" Robert R. McBurncy. 
" w " C. L. Mead. 

" " Elbert B. Munroe. 
" k ' 11 Richard C. Morse. 
" Wm.'S. Sloan. 
N. Y., Poughkeepsie, Edmund P. Piatt. 
O., Wooster, S. F. Scovil, D. D. 
Pa., Philadelphia, John H. Converse. 

T. DeWitt Cuyier. 
Nelson F. Evans. 
" " James A. Warden. D. D, 

Pa., Pittsburgh, S. P, Harbison. 
R. I., Peace Dale, R. G. Hazard, 2d. 
Vt., Brattleboro, J. J. Estey. 
Vt., St. Johnsbury, Franklin Fairbanks. 
Wis., Milwaukee, Geo. J. Rogers. 



*The Trustees are italicized. 



5 



OFFICERS. 



President, 
Rev. DAVID ALLEN REED. 



Vice-President, 
Rev. J. H. VINCENT, D. D. 



Treasurer, CHARLES MARSH. 



Recording Secretary, 
Rev. S. L. MERRELL. 



Corresponding Secrepary, 
OLIVER C. MORSE. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE : 

Henry S. Lee, J. H. Appleton, E. C. Rogers, S. F. Chester, 
with Officers, ex officio. 



The specific design of this School is "To train young men for the duties 
of General Secretaries and Physical Directors in Young Men's Christian 
- Associations, and of Sunday School Workers and Pastors' Helpers." 

In no sense does it offer a short road to the ministry, or encroach upon 
the sphere of the theological seminary. 



The control of this School is vested in the Trustees, of whom four, 
with the officers ex officio, constitute an Executive Committee. 

The Trustees are chosen hy the Corporation. The Instructors are ap- 
pointed by the Trustees. 



auditors : 



E. C. RocxERS, E. Porter Dyer. H. S. Lee. 



THE DESIGN OF THE SCHOOL. 



THE CONTROL. 



6 

INSTRUCTORS IN THE GENERAL COURSE, 1889-90. 



Rev. D. A. REED, 734 State Street, 
O. C. MORSE, 219 Florida Street, 

Systematic Bible Truth and Ethics. 
Rev. T. H. HAWKS, D. D., 026 Worthington Street, 

Bible History, Exegesis, and Church History. 
Rev. S. L. MERRELL, 144 Buckingham Street, 

Rhetoric and Logic. 
Rev. E. P. ARMSTRONG, 60 Sherman Street, 

Vocal Music. 
LUTHER GTJLICK, M. D., 50 Dartmouth Street, 

Physiology and Hygiene. 
C. O. BEMIES, 780 State Street, 

Gymnastics. 
LORY PRENTISS, 780 State Street, 

Athletics. 



INSTRUCTORS IN THE SPECIAL SCHOOLS. 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Secretarial j J. T. BOWNE, 35 Clarendon Street. 
Department, W. MEYER, (Asst.,) 780 State Street. 



Physical 
Department, 



LUTHER GULICK, M. D., 50 Dartmouth Street, 
HENRY KALLENBERG, (Asst.,) 780 State Street, 
C. O. BEMIES, (Asst.,) 780 State Street, 
LORY PRENTISS, (Asst.,) 780 State Street. 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORKERS AND PASTORS' HELPERS. 



Rev. E. P. ARMSTRONG, 00 Sherman Street. 



7 

STUDENTS, 1889-90. 



Noie.— Those marked (S. S.) are in the Training School for Sunday-School Workers 
and Pastors' Helpers. Those marked (Sec.) or (Phys.) are in the Secretarial or in the 
Physical Department of the Y. M. C. A. Training School. 



SENIORS. 
Baker, George Douglas, (Sec.) 
Baker, Joseph Herbert, (S. S. ) 
Carey, Frederick Missimer, (See.) 
Cree, Thomas Kirby, Jr., (Sec.) 
Daum, William Fletcher, (Sec.) . 
Dickson,. Henry David, (Sec.) 
Dinsmore, Martin Lxjther, (Sec.) 
Fillebrowx, Herbert Martin, (Sec.) 
Flindt, Albert Edward, (Sec.) 
Ford, George Lyman, Jr., (S. S.) . 
Fuller, Frank Averill, (S. S. ) 
Honigh, Jacob Cornelius, (S. S) 
Locher, William Walter, (Sec.) . 
March, Leonard Guy, (S. S. ) . 
McCay, Nicholas Craig, (See.) 
Merwin, Milton Knapp, (Sec.) 
Parks, Will Stewart, (Sec.) . 
Special — Godtfring, Frederic William 



(Se< 



Newton, Iowa. 
Franklin, Mass. 
Pottstown, Pa. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Evansville, Ind. 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 

Boston, Mass. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Thomaston, Conn. 
Pictou, Nova Scotia. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Bridgewater, Dak. 
Appleton, Wis. 
. Utica, N. Y. 
Brownsville, Tenn. 
. Milwaukee, Wis. 



JUNIORS. 

*\m>jjew, William Alexander, (Sec.) . . New Bedford, Mass. 
*Baker, Charles Berbert, (Sec.) .... La Crosse, Wis. 

Bakeu, William Joel, (S. S.) Chicopee, Mass. 

Baldwin, Harry Anderson, (Sec.) . . \ew Albany, Ind. 



- st udied only a part of Ihr year. 



8 



Barton, William Hexry, (Phys. ) . 
Corbett, David Watson, (Sec.) 
Cowles, George Burr, (Sec.) . 
Fison, Herbert William, (Sec.) 
"Fitch, Fred. Clyde, (Sec.) i. 
Fleming, George, (Sec.) 
Fuller, George Fraxcis, (S. S. ) 
Gains, Frederick Alexander, (Sec.) 
Garland, Albert Ellsworth, (Sec.) 
•Grant, Donald, (Sec.) 
*Hamblex, Walter Phipps, (Sec.) 
Horton, Fred. Buell, (Sec.) 
Keller, William Johnson, (Phys.) 
Kingsbury, Charles Hexry, (Sec.) 
Kraft, Frederick August, (Phys.) 
Lanphear, Walter Eugene, (S. S.) 
Larimore, Irving, W., (Phys.) . 
Lunbeck, Arthur Wilbur, (Sec.) . 
Macdoxald, George Daniel, (Sec.) 
*Madigan, William D., (Phys.) 
McKee, William Charles, (Sec.) 
Medd, Hexry, (Sec.) .... 
Mont Gomerie, Lewis Richard, (Phys, 
Ninde, William Edward, (Phys.) . 
Patrick, Edward Asa, (S. S.) . 
Pell, Frank William, (Sec.) . 
♦Phillips, Charles Dickens, (Phys.) 
♦Richardson, Samuel Willard, (Sec.) 
Ropes, James Miller, Jr., (Sec.) 
Sandford, William Burton, (S. S.) 
Smith, John Peter, (Sec.) . 
Taylor, Charles Samuel, (S. S.) . 
-*Vo.\ Zastrow, Benno George, (Sec.) 



Waltham, Mass. 
Montreal, Que. 
New Britain, Conn. 
Peacedale, R. I. 

Keene, N. H. 
San Diego, Cal. 
. Plymouth, Mass. 
. Portsmouth, Va. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
New Glasgow, N. S. 
Pictou, N. S. 
Rome, N. Y. 
Springfield, Mass. 
South Killingly, Conn. 
. Milwaukee, Wis. 
Chaplin, Conn. 
Decatur, Ills. 
Warrensburg, Mo. 
New Glasgow, N. S. 
Brattleboro, Yt. 
Wheeling, W. Ya. 
. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Windsor, Out. 
Rome, N. Y. 
Chicopee, Mass. 
Racine, Wis. 
Rome, N. Y. 
Painesville, (). 

Salem, Mass. 
Chaplin, Conn. 
Sioux City, Iowa. 
Meriden, Conn. 
Indepedence, Iowa. 



*Studied only a part of the year. 



9 



Winslow, George Heney, (Sec. ) . . . Gilbertville, Mass. 

Theis, Paul Eugene, (Sec.) . . . Paris, France. 
Williams, George, (Phys. ) . . . Marquette, Mich. 



Special. 



ONE YEAR'S COURSE. 
Hart, Burton Wood worth, (S. S.) . . West Williamsri eld, O. 

| Halsted, Alfred Thompson, (Phys.) . Paterson, N". J. 
Special. 1 McCurdy, James Huff, (Phys.) . . Princeton, Me. 

Seerley, Frank \ewell, (Phys.) . Oshkosh, Wis. 



10 



THE GENERAL COURSES INSTRUCTION 

is common to all the students. It covers two years, and includes the 
folowing topics : 
The Bible ; 

Systematic Bible Truth ; 

Evidences of Christianity ; 

Christian Ethics ; 

Church History ; 

Methods of Work, etc. ; 

Rhetoric and Logic; 

Rules for Deliberative Bodies ; 

Vocal Music ; 

Physiology and Hygiene ; 

Gymnastics and Athletics. 

THE BIBLE. 

Junior Year. 
Biblical History (O. T.); 
The Life of Christ; 
History of the Apostolic Church ; 
Biblical Geography and Chronology. 

Senior Year. 

Exegesis, Selections from the Psalms and Prophets ; 
The Old Testament Canon; 

Exegesis in Harmony of the Gospels and Epistles; 

The English Versions; 

Introduction. 

Text-Books : Dr. Smith's Old and New Testament Histories (Harper's 
Student Series); Robinson's English Harmony of the Gospels. 

SYSTEMATIC BIBLE TRUTH, ETC. 

Junior Year — First Term. 
Outline Study of the Evidences of Christianity, of Ethics and of the 
Fundamental Doctrines common to all evangelical denominations. 



11 



Junior Year — Second and Third Terms. 

Study of the Books of the Bible, with reference to the following topics : 
(1) The great divisions of each book; (2) the great historical facts; (3) 
the great religious facts and spiritual truths; (4) the great characters; 
(5) the great types and their 'development in the other books; (6) the 
great prophecies and promises, and their fulfillment; (7) practical les- 
sons. Special attention will be paid, all through this course, to the great 
doctrines previously studied in outline, as they are developed in each 
book. 

Senior Year — First Term. 

Christian Ethics. 

Senior Year — Second and Third Terms. 

The Books of the Bible, including the Authorship, Aim, General 
Divisions and Leading Facts, Truths, Prophecies and Characters of each 
of the books studied. 

IN". B. During February, 1 800, a course of twelve lectures on " Funda- 
mental Truths of the Scriptures," will be given to the Senior Class by 
Mr. Russell Sturgis of Boston, Muss. 

THE IIlSTokY OF EVANGELICAL CHRISTIANITY. 

Senior Year. 

The attempt is made to obtain a knowledge in outline, of the progress 
of Christianity and the Church down to the present time, prominence 
being given to Missions and the development of doctrine. 

Text-Book: Fisher's History of the Christian Church. 

METHODS OF WORK, ETC., 

Under the following heads, receive special attention throughout the entire 
course : The prayer meeting and its methods; How to study and use the 
Bible; How to deal with Inquirers; The Worker's Training Class: The 
Literary Society, 

RHETORIC AND L()(i [C. 

Rhetoric is taught during the Junior, and Logic during the Senior 
year. Written compositions are required of all, once in three weeks dur- 
ing the entire course. 

Text-Book in Rhetoric: A Manual of Composition and Rhetoric by 
Jno. s. Bart, L. L. 1). (Eldridge & Bro., Philadelphia.) 



13 



RtTLES FOIi DELIBERATIVE BODIES 

Will be taught during the Senior year. Manual, Roberts 1 "Rules of 
Order." 

VOCAL MUSIC, 

To prepare the student to lead in devotional singing, is taught during 
both years. 

PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE, 

AYith especial reference to the care and development of the body and 
mind. 

Text Book : Martin's "Human Body." (Briefer Course.) 

GYMNASTICS AND ATHLETICS. 

It is the purpose of this general course, to give each student a practi- 
cal knowledge of this work, that will enable him intelligently to direct 
a small gymnasium. A sufficient amount of theory will be given to 
insure the intelligent appreciation of the field. The prescription of ex- 
ercise, Physical Diagnosis and kindred subjects will not be treated of, 
as experience has shown that a smattering in these lines is a dangerous 
thing. Each student will receive a physical examination, and work will 
be prescribed that will, as far as possible, put him in the best condition 
for study and future work. 

Theory. — Elementary Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene. 

In connection with these subjects will be taken up the philosophy of 
the different gymnastic systems, and the theory of massage. 

First Aid to Injured. 

Lectures on History of Physical Education, Effect of body on the 
mind, Literature of Physical Education. 
Measurements, how taken and used. 

Purity, scientific basis and methods of work for its advancement. 

Practice. — Calisthenics. Use of Developing Apparatus. Light Gym- 
nastics, including dumb bells, wands, Indian clubs, etc. 

Heavy Gymnastics, Vaulting, Horizontal and Parallel bars, Horse, 
Buck, etc. 

Athletics, Walking, Running, Jumping, Throwing the Hammer, Put- 
ting the Shot, Pole Vaulting, Base Ball, Foot Ball, Lawn Tennis. 

Class work especially adapted to the needs of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Associations, on all of the apparatus, will be committed by the stu- 
dent. 



13 



3ST. B. This general course in Gymnastics and Athletics is common to 
all, and should not be confused with the Department Course' outlined on 
pages 19-24. 

The need of a student to take any given studies must be decided by the 
instructors; but all are required to practice original composition, and 
extempore speaking. 

The General Course of study is meant to be adapted to the average stu- 
dent. If anJP should find a part of the course needless because of previ- 
ous studies and discipline, they will be expected to give themselves to a 
more thorough acquaintance with the remaining sections, and to pass 
an examination upon the entire course. 

Each accepted student, who has not already done so, is urged to read 
carefully in advance of his coming, "The Student's Manual," by Rev. 
John Todd. 



For graduation at the end of one year, see item on ••Promotion and 
Graduation" on page 34. 



SPECIAL LECTURE IX THE GENERAL COURSE. 
September 24, 1889, Mr. I). L. Moody. Topic: "Some of the tilings 
which lead to Success in Christian Work." 



14 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
TRAINING SCHOOL. 



THE SECEETARIAL DEPARTMENT. * 



Object: Training for the special duties of the General Secretaryship 
of the Young Men's Christian Association. 



Department Course of Study.* 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
FniST Division — The Field, Objects and History. 

I. — The Field and its Limits. — (A) The work — why needed; (B) A defi- 

nite work — for and by young men; (C) The work distinctively re- 
ligious; (D) Relation to the Church. 

II. — Summary of the Objects and Work. — (A) The means employed in 

cities; (B) The means employed in small towns. 

III. — History of the Rise and Growth of the Institution. — (A) Origin of 
the present movement; Earlier attempts; Introduction into America 
and work prior to the Civil War; Army work; Resumption of 
home work; Development of the International work and its depart- 
ments; Outgrowths of the work. 

Second Division — The Organization and its Home. 

7. — Organization. — (A) When and how to organize; (B) Practical Hints. 

II. — The Constitution. 

III. — Branches and Sub-Organizations. 

IV. — The Management. — (A) The directors; (B) The officers. 

V. — Standing Committees. — (A) Importance, enlistment and composition ; 

(B) How to organize, etc. ; (C) Principles and methods of construc- 
tion; (D) Names and duties. 

* This is in addition to the whole of the General Course outlined on pages 10-13. See 
also schedule of Class Work by Departments on pp. 30-31. 



15 



VI. — Membership. — (A) Classes of membership; (B) How to secure 
members; (C) The membership committee; (D) How to retain 
members; (E) Miscellaneous. 

VII. — Membership continued. — (A) The development of active members; 

(B) The associate membership and its relations; (C) The members' 
meeting, or reception. 

VIII. — The General Secretary. — (A) The office and work; (B) The quali- 
fications. 

IX. — The General Secretary. His Belationships. — (A) To churches and 
pastors ; (B) To officers, directors and committees ; (C) To 
other employees ; (D) To the members ; (E) To the religious 
work; (F) To the business community; (G) To his fellow 
secretaries. 

X. — The General Secretary. Personal Hints. — 1, The beginner; 2, u Sec- 

retarialism;" 3, The press; 4, Correspondence; 5, The memoran- 
dum book; 6, Statistics; 7, Prominent visitors; 8, Growth; 9, 
Health; 10, Dress; 11, Conversation; 12, Economy; 13, The other 
sex; 14, Human nature ; 15, Spiritual life; 16, System; 17, Finances; 
18, Accepting a call. 

XI. — Securing and Training Secretaries. — (A) Demand and supply; (B) 
Methods of training. 

XII. — The Association Home. — (A) Tenure. Advantages of owning a, 
building; (B) Location; (C) Arrangement; (D) Equipment. 

XIII. — The Care of the Home. — (A) General principles; (B) llepairs; 

(C) Safety; (D) Order and cleanliness. 

XIV — How to get a Building. — (A) Preparatory work; (B) Plan of a 
canvass; (C) Hints and cautions. 

XV. — The Building Movement. — Its beginning and growth. 

SENroi; FEAR. 

THIED DIVISION. — METHODS < > V WORK. 

I. — Current Finances. — (A) Ways and [means; 1, Annual budget; 2, . 

Sources of income; 3, Solicitation; (B) Collections and disburse- 
ments ; ( C ) Financial bookkeeping. 

II. — Real Estate and Endowment Funds. — (A) Incorporation; (B) Trus- 

tees; (C) Endowments; (D) Debt, taxes, etc. 



16 



III. — Records and Public Presentation of the Work. — [A) Records and 
statistics; (B) Anniversaries; (C) The parlor conference; (D) 
Printed matter. 

IV. — Information and Belief. — (A) Boarding houses; (B) The employ- 

ment bureau; (C) Visiting the sick; (D) Destitute young men. 

V. — The Bible in Association Work. — (A) Individual study; Methods and 

helps. (B) Class study; 1, A Bible class indispensable; 2, Relation 
of the General Secretary ; 3, Principal divisions ; 4, Time, place and 
appliances; 5, The teacher; 6, The class; 7, The lesson; 8, Prepar- 
ing the lesson; 9, Teaching the lesson; Hints on training classes. 
(C) Practical work with the unconverted; 1. Personal work — the 
enquirer, personal fitness of the worker, time, place and manner of 
approach, methods with the inquirer; 2, The Evangelistic Bible 
Class; 3, The Bible in the Evangelistic meeting — the scripture les- 
son, proof texts, Bible readings. 

VI. — Beligious Meetings, etc. — (A) The young men's meeting; (B) Other 

meetings at the rooms ; ( C ) Religious work outside the rooms — 
work in public institutions, sermons to young men, distribution of 
religious reading matter, the invitation committee. 

VII. — The Intellectual Department. — (A) Introduction; (B) The reading- 
room; (C) The library; (D) Evening classes. 

VIII. — The Social Department. — (A) The evening committee; (B) The 
social rooms; (C) Social entertainments. 

IX. — The Physical Department. 

X. — Work Among Boys. 

XL— Work Among Special Classes.— (A) College Students; (B) Railroad 
men; (C) Commercial travelers; (D) Foreign speaking young men; 
(E) Miscellaneous classes. 

XII. — Women's Work for Young Men. 

FOTJBTH DIVISION. — THE GENEEAL WORK. 

I. — District Work. 

IL — State and Provincial Work. 

III. — The International Work in North America. 

IV. — The World's Committee and its Work. 

Text-Book : " Hand book of the History, Organization and Methods of 
Work of Young Men's Christian Associations." This book was pre- 
pared especially for the use of this department. 



17 



Practice. 

During the whole of the Junior Year, all students in this department 
are required to be members of the Armory Hill Association, which occu- 
pies rooms in the School building; to do regular practical work on one 
or more of its standing committees ; and to attend all stated meetings 
of the committees to which appointed, and the regular sessions of the 
Training Class. 

During the Senior Year, the same must be done in connection with the 
Central Association — unless the student is preparing especially for 
Railroad work, when he will be required to unite and work with the 
Railroad Association. 

All are given practice in preparing monthly reports of committees, 
minutes of meetings, items for newspapers and bulletins, printer's 
copy, and proof reading; and are expected to attend each year at 
least two Association Conventions. The instructors decline to grant 
leave of absence to attend conventions other than those prescribed in 
the Department Course. 



18 



SPECIAL LECTURES AND CONFERENCES, 
Ix the Secretarial Department, in 1889-90, 

April 26, 1889. — Robert McCann, Traveling Secretary of Ireland. 
"Encouragements and discouragements in the Irish Work." 

April 20. — E. Hofer, General Secretary, Zurich, Switzerland. "Asso- 
ciation Work in German Switzerland." 

April 27. — Robert Burn, General Secretary, Aldersgate Street, Lon- 
don. " Importance of Thoroughness in Preparation for the Secretary- 
ship." 

April 27. — Carl Fries, National Secretary of Sweden. "The Prospect 
of Association Work in Sweden." 

September 22. — David McConaughy, Secretary of the International 
Committee for India. "The Claims of the Young Men of India upon 
the Young Men of America." 

January 14, 1890.— E. Porter Dyer, Editor of The Springfield Union. 
" The Secretary's Relation to Newspapers and to Newspaper Men." 

March 5-6. — D. C. Gilmore, Librarian Grand Central Department of 
the Railroad Branch, New York City, four lectures as follows : 

1. The Association Library. Foundation of Modern Library Methods. 

2. Classification, Care of Books, etc. 

3. Official Lists, Charging Systems, etc. 

4. Cataloguing. 

April — Thomas K. Cree, Secretary of the International Committee. 
" Some of the Things to be Considered Before Accepting a Call." 



19 



THE YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
TRAINING SCHOOL. 



THE PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT.* 

i 



Object: Training for the special duties of Physical Directors. 



Course in Theory, t 



JUNIOR YEA K. 

FIRST TERM. 

Physics: Elementary Physics. Balfour Stewart. 
Physiology: Martin's " Human Body." (Large Edition. ) 

Especial emphasis will be laid on those parts that are of the greatest 
value from the gymnastic standpoint. The fundamental principles of 
Physical Education and training, will be discussed in connection with 
the proper chapters. Theory of Massage will here receive attention. 
In connection with the study of the reproductive system, the physiolog- 
ical aspect of the personal purity problem will be discussed, including 
inquiries into the exact nature of the effects dependent on the violation 
of these laws. 

SECOND TERM. 

Physiology: Completed. ' 
A x atom v : Gray. 

Osteology and myology principally, with especial reference to the me- 
chanics of the body. Anatomy of the thorax and contained viscera arc 
included. 



* The special circular of the Summer Session of tins Department will he ready ahout 
March 1. 

t See schedule of Class Work on pages 30-31. 



20 



THIRD TERM. 

First Aid to the Injured: Handbook of First Aid, Morton. 
Hygiene : Text Book of Hygiene, Wilson, 

With especial reference to baths and bathing, clothing, diet, 

ventilation, temperature, etc. 
Physical Department of the Young Men's Christian Association and 

its management. 

Training Class: Methods of religious work. 

Bible Class: Development and use of Committees. 
The Gymnasium: 

Its location, equipment, apparatus, repair of, etc. 

Knotting and splicing. 
Keview and Examination. 



SENIOK YEAB. 

FIRST TERM. 

Physiology: (Advanced,) Foster. 

Theory of Training : Maclaren. 

Massage : Massage as a Mode of Treatment, Murrell. 

Psychology: 

Especially with reference to the effects of the body on the 
mind. Attention will be given to the personal purity question 
from its mental aspect. 

SECOND TERM. 

Psychology: Completed. 

History of Physical Education among Greeks, Germans, Swedes, 
and in England and America. Systematic Training of the 
Body, Schaible; Physical Education in American Colleges, 
Hartwell. 

Literature of Physical Education: 

The following books will be read by the student and dis- 
cussed in the class room: How to Get Strong, Blaikie; Sound 
Bodies for Our Boys aud Girls, Blaikie; Physical Education, 
Maclaren; Walker's Manly Exercise, " Craven ;" Brawn and 



21 



Brain, Aldridge ; Physical Culture for Home and School, 
Dowd ; Health by Exercise, Taylor ; Physical Exercises, 
Wood ; Athletics and Football, Shearman ; New Gymnastics 
for Men, Women end Children, Lewis; Education, Spencer; 
Indian Club Exercises, Kehoe ; British Sports and Pastimes, 
Trollope ; Gymnastics for the Fingers and Wrist, Ward-Jack- 
son ; Exercise and Training, Their Effect on Health, Lee ; 
University Oars, Morgan; Physical Education, Roth; Salz- 
man's Gymnastics for Youth; The Brawnville Papers, Tyler ; 
Man, Moral and Physical, Jones; Physiology of Bodily Exer- 
cise, Legrange. 

These papers and pamphlets will also be studied: Anthro- 
pometric Manual, Amherst College, Hitchcock and Seeley ; 
The Physical Proportions of the Typical Man, Sargent; The 
Anatomy of the Contortionist, Dwight ; Physical Training, 
Sargent; The Influence of Exercise on Health, Richards; 
The Physical Development of Women, Sargent ; Effects of 
Military Drill on Boys, Sargent ; Military Drill and Gymnastic 
Training in Physical Culture. Hartwell ; Physiology of Exer- 
cise, Hartwell. 
Philosophy of the Various Gymnastic Systems: 

German, Swedish, Athletic, (English), Delsarte, Hitchcock, 
Sargent. 

THIRD TERM. 

Anthropometry: How to take measurements, and methods for their 
tabulation and use. The construction and use of Anthropo- 
metric charts. 

Physical Examination : Physical Diagnosis, Page; Differential .Med- 
ical Diagnosis, Cutler. 

In connection with this subject will be taken up those dis- 
eases, or their sequelae, which are to be met with in the ex- 
amining room. Diseases of the spine, heart, lungs and nerv- 
ous system particularly will be studied. 

Sphygmograpiiv: Practical and theoretical instruction will be given 
in the use of the sphygmograph in the examining room. 

PRESCRIPTION of exercise for those diseased conditions and deformities 
that can be treated by gymnastics. 
Use of measuring instruments, dynamometers. 

Review and Examination. 



22 



Course in Practice. 

Believing that as far as possible a teacher should have a knowledge 
of the whole subject, and not merely of that part that he is to teach, the 
course in this department has been made as far as possible a complete 
one, thus of necessity including a good deal that the students may not 
be called on to use, but which will nevertheless give them valuable 
knowledge and training. It is important that a man who is to teach 
Caesar, should have read more Latin than is contained in Caesar, he 
should be familiar with the Latin language as a whole. Thus wrestle- 
ing and boxing are introduced into this course, not with the idea that 
our pupils are to teach these things, but because they are integral parts 
of the subject, and every one who wishes to master the field of gymnas- 
tics should know about them. 

Although it is desired to give the students as wide a range of prac- 
tice as possible, still it is deemed unwise to attempt any work of a haz- 
ardous nature. 

Special attention will be given to the building up of the weak parts 
of the student, and the development of a strong, erect, symmetrical and 
graceful figure. Two hours a day will be given to practice throughout 
both years. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Calisthenics. 

Use of Developing Apparatus : 

Chest weight, floor and overhead pulleys, etc. 
Light Gymnastics; 

Dumb bells, Indian clubs, wands, push ball, etc. 

Heavy Gymnastics: 

Vaulting bar, horizontal bar, parallel bars, horse buck, etc. 

Athletics: 

The new athletic grounds covering rive acres, will be when 
completed, among the best grounds in the country. A quarter- 
mile cinder running track, rive tennis courts, two hun- 
dred and twenty-yard ''straight away" cinder track, • and 
grounds for base ball, foot ball, lacrosse, etc., will give a most 
excellent opportunity for out-door sports, which will be taken 
up during the fall and spring of each year. Running, walk- 
ing, all kinds of jumping, pole vault, putting the shot, throw- 
ing the hammer, base ball, lacrosse, foot ball, lawn tennis, 
polo (on foot), will each receive attention. 



23 



Swimming: 

Instruction will be given in the different styles of swimming, 
and also in methods of rescuing drowning persons. As soon 
as it is possible to secure the needed facilities, rowing, pad- 
dling canoes, sailing canoes, and the sailing of small boats, 
will be added to the course. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Swedish Movement; Massage; 

Use of Music in gymnastics; Dels arte Gymnastics, or the art of 

expression; 
Boxing; Wrestling; 
Fencing; Tumbling. 

Athletics will be carried on as in the Junior year. 
Pedagogy. 

Attention will be given to the art of teaching. Each stu- 
dent will be given practice in the actual leading of classes. 

Invention of Exercises; 

Especial attention will be given to the construction of gym- 
nastic drills to meet especial cases and classes. Each student 
will be required to prepare and submit such drills to the in- 
structors. 

Model Drills on all the main pieces of apparatus will be committed by 
the student before leaving the school, not that it is expected 
that he will always use such drills, for the conditions in differ- 
ent communities present different classes of men to the Physi- 
cal Director, which must be met by exercises especially ar- 
ranged to meet the peculiar conditions; but so that the stu- 
dent may have some serviceable matter on which to rely until 
he can himself take the time to prepare his own work to meet 
these local conditions. 
During the Junior Year, all students of this department are required 
to be members of the Armory Hill Association, to do regular practical 
work on one of its standing committees; and to attend to all stated 
meetings of the committee to which appointed, and the regular sessions 
of the Training Class. During the Senior Year the same must he done 
in connection with the Central Association. 

They will also be expected during the course to visit the large gymna- 
siums of either Boston or New York and that of either Harvard, Vale or 



24 



Amherst, and to attend the annual meeting of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Physical Education, unless held at too remote a 
locality; also to attend each year one State or International Convention 
of the Young Men's Christian Association. 

The general course outlined on pages 10-12 has been modified for 
the students in this department. It includes Systematic Bible Truth. 
Evidences of Christianity, Christian Ethics, and the Brief Course in As- 
sociation Work. It will thus allow three hours a day for department 
work, two for practice and one for theory. An average of three hours 
daily will be necessary in preparation for each recitation in theory. See 
schedule of Class Room Work on pages 30, 31. 

One of the best libraries on physical education is placed at the service 
of the students of this department. There is thus afforded a most ex- 
cellent opportunity for reading the best books that have been written on 
these subjects, It is thought that this is one of the most valuable feat- 
ures of the course. 

The object of this department is not to train men in any special sys- 
tem of gymnastics, or Physical Education, but to give them a broad ac- 
curate knowledge of Gymnastics and Athletics in all of the main 
branches; the body, its laws; the mind and the relation of the body to 
it; of the history of Physical Education; of the philosophy of all the 
chief gymnastic systems; of Physical Diagnosis and the prescription of 
exercise ; in fact, of all those studies that will assist in making original 
workers in this field. We have no especial theories to support, but en- 
deavor to study with equal fairness and thoroughness the work of Jahn 
of Germany, Ling of Sweden, Delsarte of France, Maclaren of England, 
and the later productions of this country. 

The graduates of this school, then, cannot be said to be the disciples of 
any school of gymnastics. It is hoped, however, that they will possess that 
scientific information and turn of mind that will enable them to recog- 
nize good wherever it may be found and to use it in the most judicious 
way. Owing to the greater and greater demands that are being made 
on those in this field, it has been found necessary largely to extend the 
course of study in this department, so that it shall include more of the 
higher, more philosophical studies. The greatest demand is for men of 
accurate scientific knowledge of this field, particularly along the line of 
the effect on the brain, of physical exercises. Thus Physiological Psy- 
chology has been included in this course. 



25 

TRAINING SCHOOL 
FOR 

SUNDAY-SCHOOL WORKERS AND PASTORS' HELPERS. 



Object : The training of young men for the duties of Sunday-school 
Missionaries and Superintendents, and Pastors' Helpers. 



Department Course of Instruction. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Term. 
L Historical and Theoretical. 

A. Aim and Scope of the Sunday-School. 

B. History, including (1) Authority; (2) Origin; (3) Growth 
and Progress; (4) Union Work; (5) Denominational Work; 
(6) Its future. 

C. Plan. 1. Church and School; (I) Their Relations; (2) Mis- 
sion Schools; (3) Place; (4) Time and Finance; (5) Library. 

2. Organization: ( 1) Constitution; (2) Officers and Com- 
mittees; (3) Grades and Classes; (4) Management; (5) 
Home Department. 

II. Practical and Normal. 

A. Bible; Books, characters, geography, constitution. 

B. Lesson Study. 
0. Frontier Work. 

D. Methods of Teaching. 

Second Term. 

C. Plan (Continued). 

3. Conventions: (1) Conferences; (2) Unions; (3) Institutes; 
(4) Local, District, County, State, International, Denomina- 
tional, Conventions; (5) Assemblies; (0) Associations: 
State, County, Town and District. 



* This is in addition to the whole of the General Course outlined on pages 10-13. See 
also schedule of Class Work by Departments on pp, 30, 31. 



26 



D. Work. I. Gathering in: (1) Canvassing; (2) Work by 
Children; (3) By Committees; (4) By Superintendents; (5) 
On the Frontier. 

2. Order *of exercises. 

3. Officers: (1) Qualifications; (2) Duties. 

4. Teachers: (1) Qualifications; (2) Duties; (3) Selection 
and Eemoval; (4) Preparation; (5) Week-day Work; (6) 
Before the Class ; ( 7 ) Personal Work. 

Third Term. 

5. Matter to teach: (1) International Lesson; (2) Supple- 
mental Lesson; (3) Music; (4) Prayer; (5) Benevolence; (6) 
Reviews. 

6. Concerts, Picnics, Excursions, Fairs, Prizes, Mottoes, Fes- 
tivals, Socials, Receptions, Vacations, Anniversaries, Ad- 
dresses, Roll of Honor, Rewards. 

E. 1. Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor: (1) Re- 
lation to Sunday-school and Church; (2) Organization and 
Methods; (3) Needs and Benefits; (4) Reports; (5) Commit- 
tees; (6) Conventions. 

2. Ep worth League: (1; Object and History; (2) Constitu- 
tion; (3) Organization and Management; (4) Junior Leagues; 
(5) Reading Courses. 

II. Practical and Normal (Continued). 
Second Term. 

E. Teachers' Meetings. G. 

F. Blackboard Teaching. H. 

I. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term. 
[. Historical and Theoretical. 

E. Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor (Continued). 

F. History of Education. 

G. Study of Child Mind. 

II. Lives of Eminent Teachers. 
I. Principles of Teaching. 



Third Term. 
Object Teaching. 
Supplemental Lessons. 
Normal Methods. 



27 



II. 



Boys', Children's, Young Men's, Young 
Mother's, Missionary, Temperance, Con- 



Practical and Normal. 
J. Prayer Meetings: 
Women' s, Teachers' , 
secration, Cottage.. 
K. Praise Meetings. 
L. Reports. 

Second Term. 
Historical aid Theoretical (Concluded). 

J. The Church: (1) Organization; (2) Management; (3) Officers. 



K. 
L. 
M. 

X. 
O. 
P. 



Pastor's Helper: 
Pastoral Work. 
Mission Work. 

Training Classes. 
Committee Work. 
Printed Matter. 



(1) Place; (2) Duties; (3) Qualifications. 



Third Term. 



II. Practical and Normal (Concluded). 



Second Term. 
Gospel Meetings. 
Bible Readings. 



Text Books: The Young Teacher, 
Trumbull; Seven Laws of Teaching, 
brary, Dunning; The Life of Robert 



Third Term. 
O. Training Classes. 
P. Records and Reports. 
(}. Printing. 

Groser; Teaching and Teachers, 
Gregory; The Sunday-School Li- 
Raikes, Lloyd; Normal Outlines, 



Hurlburt; Outline Study of Man, Hopkins. 



N. B. Each student in this School is expected to connect himself, if 
possible, with a Sunday-School of his own denomination in this city, and 
work in it. 

N. B. The special aim of this Training School is to combine, for the 
best practical results, the Theory and Drill of the course with the Act- 
ual Work done outside, under the inspection and counsel of the Instruc- 
tor who is, at the same time, Superintendent of one of the largest Sun- 
day-Schools in New England. 



28 



SPECIAL LECTURES. 

IN THE TRAINING SCHOOL. FOR S. S. WORKERS AND PASTORS' HELPERS. 

1. " Methods of Sunday-School Work on the Frontier." 

Rev. Geo. H. Griffin, Secretary of the New England branch of 
the American Sunday-School Union. 

2. " Qualifications for Christian Workers." 

Rev. J. L. Hurlbut, D. D., Secretary Methodist Episcopal Sun- 
day-School Union. 

3. " City Evangelization." 

Rev. A. G. Lawson, D. D., Secretary of the "Baptist Social 
Union," Boston, Mass. 

4. " Work of the Salaried Superintendent." 

Dea. John Wiard, Superintendent South Congregational Church, 
New Britain, Conn. 

5. "Conventions, Conferences, Associations." 

Mr. W. H. Hall, Secretary of the Connecticut Sunday-School As- 
sociation and Member of the International Sunday-School Com- 
mittee. 

6. 'Work of the Sunday-School Missionary." 

Mr. E. B. Stevenson, Assistant Superintendent of the North 
West District of the American Sunday-School Union. Rev. W. 
B. D. Gray, Missionary of the Congregational Sunday-School 
and Publishing Society. 

7. " Office and Duties of the Pastor's Helper." 

Mr. H. J. Gillett, Helper to the Pastors in the Fourth Congre- 
' gational Church, Hartford, Conn. Mr. W. H. Swallow, Helper 
in the State Street Baptist Church, Springfield, Mass. 

8. Rev. Graham Taylor, D. D., Hartford, Conn. 

(Subject to be announced). 

9. Rev. A. E.Winship, Boston, Mass., Editor " Journal of Education: " 
"Essentials for Successful Christian Work." 

10. " Poverty and Pauperism and their Treatment. (3 lectures). 

Mi:. Chas. D. Kellogg, of the Charity Organization Society, New 
York, N. Y. 



30 

SCHEDULE OF CLASS WORK BY DEPARTMENTS. 

(liable to change.) 



JUNIOKS. 



Fkiday. 1 Till: iiisi) a v. | Wednesday. | Tuesday. | Monday. \ \ 




SECRETARIAL 

DEPARTMENT. 


PHYSICAL 
DEPARTMENT. 


SUNDAY SCHOOL 
DEPARTMENT. 


9.30 a.m 
10.30 " 
2.00 p.m. 
3.00 k> 
4.00 " 
8.30 ■' 


Physiology. 
Rhetoric . 
Vocal Music. 

Bible History. 


Department Theory. 

Department Practice. 
Department Practice. 


Physiology. 
Rhetoric. 
Vocal Music. 

Bible History. 


9.30 a. m. 
10.30 " 
2.00 p.m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 
7.30 " 


Rhetoric. 

Systematic Bible Truth. 

Bible History. 
Junior Training Class. 


Department Theory. 

Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Practice. 

Junior Training Class. 


Rhetoric. 

Systematic Bible Truth. 

Bible History. 
Junior Training Class. 


9.30 a.m. 
10.30 ' 
2 00 p.m. 
3.00 " 
4 00 " 
8.30 


Department Work. 
Systematic Bible Truth 

Bible History. 


Department Theory. 

Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Practice. 
Y. M. C. A. Work. 
Department Practice. 


Department Work. 
Systematic Bible Truth. 

Bible History. 


9.30 a.m. 
10.30 " 
2.00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Department Work. 
Systematic Bible Truth. 


Department Theory. 

Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Practice. 
Y. M. C. A. Work. 


Department Work. 
Systematic Bible Truth. 


9.30 a.m. 
10.30 " 
2.00 p.m. 
3.00 " 

4.00 " 
8.30 11 


Department Work. 
Vocal Music. 

P. M. T. and L. S. 


Department Theory. 

P. M. T. and L. S. 

Department Practice 


Department Work. 
Vocal Music. 

P. M. T. and L. S. 



All students are required to attend daily prayers at 5 p. m., to practice 
daily in the Physical Department at 11.45 a. m., and to furnish original 
compositions once in three weeks. 



31 

SCHEDULE OF CLASS WORK BY DEPARTMENTS. 

(liable to change.) 



SENIORS. 



i Friday. | Thursday. | Wednesday. | Tuesday. | Monday. | 1 




SECRETARIAL 

DEPARTMENT. 


PHYSICAL 
DEPARTMENT. 


SUNDAY SCHOOL 
DEPARTMENT. 


8.30 a. m. 
9.30 11 
10.30 k ' 
2.00 p.m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Department Work. 

Church History. 
Vocal Music. 


Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 

Department Practice. 


Department Work. 

Church History. 
Vocal Music. 


8.30 a.m. 
9.30 kt 
10.30 • 
2.00 p.m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 
7.30 


Department work. 

Physiology. 

Exegesis. 

Senior Training Class. 


Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 

Department Practice. 
Senior Training Class. 


Department Work. 

Physiology. 

Exegesis. 

Senior Training Class. 


8.30 a.m. 
9.30 " 
10.30 " 
2.00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 
Exegesis. 

Rules for Delib. Bodies. 


Department Theory. 
Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Practice. 

Department Practice. 


Systematic Bible Truth. 
Exegesis. 

Rules for Delib. Bodies. 


8.30 a.m. 
9.30 " 
10.30 " 
2.00 p. in. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

Exegesis. 
Church History. 


Department Theory. 
Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Practice. 

Department Practice. 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

Exegesis 
Church History. 


8.30 a.m. 
9.30 il 
10.30 " 
2.00 p.m. 
3.00 «' 
4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

Church History. 

J Prayer Meeting Talks 

I and Literary Societies. 


Department Theory. 
Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Practice. 

Department Practice. 
P. M. T. and L. 8. 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

Church History. 
P. M. T. and L. S. 



All students arc required to attend daily prayers at 5 p. m., to practice 
daily in the Physical Department at 11.45 a. m., and to furnish original 
compositions once in three works. 



32 



TERMS OF ADMISSION, ETC. 



The School for Christian Workers is open only to Christian young 
men, over eighteen years of age, who have already shown ability in the 
direction of the work for which they wish to prepare. 

Each applicant for admission shall give evidence of having had at 
least a fair English education. If a graduate of a college or high school, 
he shall, upon entering, show his certificate of graduation; if not, he 
must before he can be accepted, pass a brief preliminary examination. 
Particulars of this will be sent upon the return of the application blank. 

Business experience is very desirable. 

Each applicant shall be a member in good standing of an evangelical 
church, and if admitted shall bring a certificate to this effect and unite 
with some church of his choice in this city. 

Each applicant shall fill out and return "Confidential blank, No. 1," 
giving at least two references as to character and qualifications. With 
this returned blank, in order to defray the expense of investigation, 
must be enclosed, if in the United States, twenty cents in postage 
stamps; if from Canada, twenty-four cents in Canadian stamps; and if 
from other Postal Union countries, the equivalent of forty cents in the 
stamps of the country from which the application comes. Several 
weeks are sometimes required in making a thorough investigation, 
hence the desirability of making application as early as possible. Only 
after satisfactory reports are received concerning him, can any student 
be admitted to the School. 

The School year begins with the first Wednesday in September. Stu- 
dents who enter for one year, or the course, will not be admitted after 
the last of October. Those who can enter for a few months only, are 
admitted at any time; but nothing aside from the regular work is prom- 
ised to such. It will be greatly to the advantage of all to enter at the 
beginning of the year. 

Too much emphasis cannot be laid upon the importance of taking the 
entire course, wherever it is possible. 

Each shall give at least one week's notice if for any reason he wishes 
to leave the School before the end of the year. 

Each is received upon probation ; and when it becomes clearly evident 
that the pre-requisites for success are wanting, he will no longer be re- 
tained in the School. 

It should be distinctly understood that neither the School nor its in- 
structors agree to find places for students upon their leaving. 



33 

ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES. 

Fok the School Yeae of Forty Weeks. 



The following estimate of expenses is based upon the experience of 
1889-90: 



Table board, ..... 


from $130 to $140 


Furnished room, in Building, with light and heat, 


40 


40 


Tuition, (there are no extr as), . 


50 


50 


Gymnasium dress, .... 


4 i. 


1 6 


Washing, about ..... 


12 ' 


' 16 


Text and Note Books,* .... 


" 12 ' 


' 20 


Attendance upon Conventions, 


14 " 


18 




$262 


$290 



The above estimate covers only the items specified, and not 
other necessary incidentals which each must calculate for 

HIMSELF. 

The expenses of transients vary from $6.00 to $7.00 per week. 

Only forty-four students can be lodged in the present building, and 
rooms are assigned as the students are accepted; rooms so assigned, un- 
less by special engagement, will not be held more than one day after 
the opening of the term. Furnished rooms outside the building cost 
from $1.25 to $2.00 per week; table board, from $3.25 to $4.00 per week. 

Tuition is payable promptly on the last Mondays in September and 
January, one-half at each payment. Room rent, on last Monday in 
each month. No reduction of rent will be made to a student who en- 
gages a room and fails to appear at the specified time, nor to one who 
vacates his room less than a month before the close of the School. Rent 
stops only when the room is vacated and the key delivered to the janitor. 
A deposit of twenty-five cents will be required for each key to the en- 
trance of the Gymnasium. 

Students will save themselves trouble and expense by bringing ex- 
change on New York and Boston banks rather than local checks. 

A limited normber of students who have not sufficient means, can work 
at printing and aff''Ma^igMtoi^(ttfe. in wood and iron in connection with 

the Christian Industrial and Technical School; which is in the immedi- 

i ^ 'jh"' 

: In the Physical Department the books will cost from $20 to $35. 



34 



ate vicinity, and earn enough to defray a part of their expenses. The 
amount earned wul of course depend entirely upon their skill in these 
lines, but beginners wftt f "b«.able to earn .-onieUuu^-4#4!HT^d by this 
arrangement that the entire ^om^ of study may be covered, though the 
time required will necessarily be extended to three.or four years. 



ROOMS. 



Each student lodging in the building will care for his own room, 
which must be kept scrupulously clean. He will be expected to provide 
sheets, pillow and bolster slips, towels and soap. Beds are all single, 3 feet 
in width; pillows, 18x2(1 inches; bolsters, 18 x 36 inches. Rooms are 
liable to weekly inspection. 



PROMOTION AND GRADUATION. 



A student desiring to enter upon the regular Senior course, must first 
pass the examinations of the Junior course and be recommended for 
promotion by the superintendent of the special department to which he 
belongs. 

A student who completes the general and either of the department 
courses, or an equivalent (passing seventy per cent, in his examinations 
upon the whole) and is recommended for graduation by the superinten- 
dent of the special department to which he belongs, will receive a di- 
ploma. 

A student in either department, who shall be able, at the expiration 
of one school year, to pass a satisfactory examination on the entire course 
prescribed for that department (see schedule on pages 30, 31) shall be 

I itled to a diploma. 



One who does not complete the course, can have a certificate setting 
forth the amount and character of the work done by him, if he desires it. 
by application to the Recording Secretary. 



LOCATION. 



Springfield is the metropolis of Western Massachusetts. It has about 
forty thousand inhabitants, while it is the rival in wealth and commer- 
cial influence of cities many times greater, and its manufactures are 
famed the world over. 

It is a railroad center easily accessible from every direction. Lying 
on the great thoroughfares from Boston to New York, from Boston to 
Albany and the West, from Montreal to New York, and in the midst of 
a densely populated manufacturing region, more than a hundred passen- 
ger trains daily bring in or bear away their living freight. 

Springfield is in one of the most delightful parts of the charming Con- 
necticut valley. Itself beautiful for its public edifices and private dwel- 
lings, its streets, parks, lawns and trees — it is a beautiful gem in a more 
beautiful setting. 

It combines the advantages of the city and the country. It has a 
public library now numbering 80,000 volumes, in a building which 
would be an honor to any city. Its common and high schools are sel- 
dom surpassed. It has a large population of active Christians who wor- 
ship in edifices, some of which have a national reputation for architec- 
tural beauty. There is a degree of intellectual, social, moral and relig- 
ious earnestness which is seldom found except in the great centers of 
population. 

The site of the building for The School for Christian Workers is in 
The Bighlands, in a part of the city which is attracting much attention for 
its healthfulness. It is near the head of State Street, a broad and beau- 
tiful avenue, and lias the combined advantages of easy access to the cen- 
ter of the city with its privileges, and of nearness to the open country. 
The friends of the School think that no better place could have been 
Chosen for such an institution. 

The Armory Hill horse cars {with yellow dash-boards) pass the Union 
station, running directly to the School, corncrState and Sherman streets. 



36 



FOR GENERAL INFORMATION 

Concerning the School or its finances, apply to O. C. Morse, Correspond- 
ing Secretary, School for Christian Workers, Springfield, Mass. 



FOR SPECIAL INFORMATION 

Concerning the work of the departments, address as follows, at Spring- 
field, Mass. : 

Y. M. C. A. TRAINING SCHOOL, 
Secretarial Department. — J. T. Bowjste, 35 Clarendon Street. 
Physical Department. — Luther Gulick, M. D., 56 Dartmouth Street. 

TRAINING SCHOOL FOR S. S. WORKERS, 
Key. E. P. Armstrong, 00 Sherman Street. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 



Inquiries concerning the finances will receive immediate attention if 
addressed to O. C. Morse, Corresponding Secretary, School for Christian 
Workers ; and remittances may be made to him payable to the order of 
the Treasurer, Charles Marsh, Cashier Pynchon National Bank, 
Springfield. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath to The School for Christian Workers, In Springfield 
Mass., the sum of dollars.* 



BEQUEST FOR ENDOWMENT. 



I give and bequeath to The School for Christian Workers, in Springfield, 
Massachusetts, the sum of , to be safely invested by them 

and called the Fund. The Interest of this fund to be 

applied to the use of the School.* 



PERPETUAL LOAN FUND. 



For the purpose of founding a perpetual loan fund in The School for 
Christian Workers (or either of its special schools, if so stated), I hereby 
give the sum of four thousand dollars — or its equivalent in good securi- 
ties at cash value — to be safely invested by them, the income to be loaned 
toward the education of students who have already shown ability in the 
School. 



*Or the testator may specify, towards the current expenses ; or towards the support 
of a chair of instruction in the general course, or in either of the special schools ; or, to 
be used as a loan towards the education of students who have shown ability in either 
of the special schools. 



p 24-lH 



The experience of the past six years and the greatly increased facilities 
in prospect promise to make the work of the seventh year the most success- 
ful since the school was founded. 




THE LAKE FROM THE NEW GROUNDS. 



The Trustees have just purchased about thirty acres of land lying 
immediately in the city, furnishing abundant room for all the buildings which 
the school can ever require. Seven acres have been already laid out as 
Athletic Grounds, including running tracks, tennis courts, and ball fields. 
The grounds are well wooded, with a pleasing variety of scenery, a portion 
bordering upon a beautiful lake over two miles in length which will furnish 
unexcelled facilities for swimming, etc. 

During the past year the Associations of Springfield have consolidated 
on the metropolitan plan and will offer added advantages for practical work. 



1 890-9 1 . 



SIXTH CATALOGUE 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
TRAINING SCHOOL, 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. 




WITH PROSPECTUS FOR 1801-92. 



MAY, I 89 1. 



PRESS OF 

SPRINGFIELD PRINTING AND BINDING COMPANY. 
189I. 



Established as a Department of The School for Christian Workers in 
1885, as The Young Men's Christian Association Training School in 1887, 
and separately incorporated under this name in 1890. Name changed in 
1 89 1 to International Young Men 's Christian Association Training School. 




THE DESIGN OF THE SCHOOL : 
To train young men as Secretaries, Physical Directors, or other officers 
of Young Men's Christian Associations. 



CALENDAR. 



Commencement Exercises and Annual Meeting of the Corporation and 
Board of Trustees, Wednesday, June lb, 1891. 

Quarterly Meetings of the Trustees on the third Wednesdays of March, 
September, and December. 



FIFTH SUMMER COURSE, 1891. 

Begins Sunday afternoon, August 2, 1891. 
Closes Saturday morning, August 29, 1891. 



SEVENTH REGULAR SCHOOL YEAR, 1891-92. 



Fall Term 



Winter Term 



Spring Term 



j Begins Wednesday afternoon, September 2, 1891. 
( Ends Friday evening, December 18, 1891. 

WINTER VACATION. 

( Begins Monday morning, January 4, 1892. 
\ Ends Friday evening, March 25, 1892. 

SPRING VACATION. 

( Begins Tuesday morning, April 5, 1892. 

< Commencement Exercises, Wednesday evening, June 

( 8, 1892. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSE. 

Students may enter at any time ; but correspondence concerning studies 
will be conducted only between the first Wednesday of September and the 
second Wednesday of June. 



The Calendar is subject to change. 
3 



CORPORATION. 



The names of Trustees are italicized. 



Australia, N. S. W., Sydney, David Walker. 

" Vict., Melbourne, H. A. Wilcox. 
France, Paris, E. Buscarlet. 
Germany, Berlin, Count Andreas Bernstorff. 
Great Britain.* 

India, Madras, W. Rierson Arbuthnot. 

" David McConaughy, Jr. 
Japan, Tokyo, John T. Swift. 
Sweden, Carlskrona, Baron Edward Barnekow. 
Switzerland, Geneva, Rev. Gustave Tophel. 
British Columbia, Victoria, F. W. Teague. 
Manitoba, Winnipeg, C. M. Copeland. 

R. J. Whitla. 
Nova Scotia, Halifax, E. W. Gorton. 
Ontario, Toronto, Thos. S. Cole. 

" " Robert Kilgour. 

Quebec, Montreal, D. A. Budge. 

" D. W. Ross. 
Ala., Birmingham, Joseph Hardie. 

" Marion, C. W. Lovelace. 
Ark., Little Rock, Col. Logan H. Roots. 
Cal., San Francisco, H. J. McCoy. 
Colo., Denver, Alfred W. Chamberlin. 
" " H. B. Chamberlin. 
" " Donald Fletcher. 
Conn., Bridgeport, W. E. Colley. 
" Hartford, Chas. A. Jewell. 
" Meriden, W. A. Kelsey. 
" Southport, Elbert B. Munroe. 
Ga., Atlanta, W. Woods White. 
111., Chicago, /. E. Brown. 
Ind., Indianapolis, Dr. L. H. Dunning. 

" Richmond, Albert G. Shepard. 
Ia., Des Moines, W. A. Magee. 

" " E. D. Sampson. 

Kan., Topeka, R. B. Gemmell. 
Ky., Louisville, J. L. Wheat. 
Me., Portland, T. E. McDonald. 
Md., Baltimore, W. H. Morriss. 
Mass., Boston, R. M. Armstrong. 
" " Jas. L. Gordon. 
" " Chas. A. Hopkins. 
" " H. M. Moore. 

" Cambridge, O. H. Durrell. 
" Campello, Preston B. Keith. 
" Fitchburg, Hon. Frederick Fosdick. 
" Manchester, Russell Sturgis. 
" Springfield, Dr. W. F. A?idrews. 

Chas. H. Barrows. 
" " H. H. Bowman. 

" J. T. Bowne. 
" E. Porter Dyer. 
" " Luther Gulick, M.D. 

" " Charles Marsh. 

" Arthur G. Merriam. 
" Oliver C. Morse. 
' ' Rev. David A lien Reed. 
Mich., Detroit, H G. Van Tuyl. 
Minn., Minneapolis, C. E. Dyer. 

John H. Elliott. 
" St. Paul, Thomas Cochran. 

T. A. Hildreth. 
Mo , Kansas City, Witten McDonald. 
" St. Louis, Geo. T. Coxhead. 



Mo., St. Louis, Frank L. Johnston. 
Neb., Omaha, J. C. Denise, M.D. 

" Yutan, Robert Weidensall. 
N. H., Concord, Allen Folger. 

" E. A. Lawrence. 
N. J., Camden, W. A. Bowen. 
" Newark, Aaron Carter, Jr. 

" H. A. Cozzens. 
" " Elkanah Drake. 
" New Brunswick, Prank L. Janeway. 
" Orange, D. F. More. 
" Plainfield, W. D. Murray. 
" Summit, Chas. P. Grant. 
N. Y., Addison, Burton G. Winton. 
" Brooklyn, F. B. Schenck. 

" Edwin F. See. 
Buffalo, S. M. Clement, Jr. 

" John B. Squire. 
New York, Fred'k A. Booth. 

Cephas Brainerd. 
" " Thos. K. Cree. 

C. C. Cuyler. 
Cleveland H. Dodge. 
Geo. A. Hall. 
" " R. R. McBurney. 

' ' Richard C. Morse. 

" " J. Gardner Smith, M.D. 

" " Erskine Uhl. 

Henry H. Webster, t 
" A. J. D. Wedemeyer. 

Benj. C. Wetmore. 
J. C. Wilson. 
L. D. Wishard. 
" Troy, L. E. Gurley. 
N. C, Charlotte, L. A. Coulter. 

Davidson College, Pr f. H. L. Smith. 
Ohio, Cincinnati, H. P. Lloyd. 

H. Thane Miller. 
Ore., Portland, Noel H. Jacks. 
Penn., Berwick, C. H. Zehnder. 
" Erie, C. W. Davenport. 
" Philadelphia, John H. Converse. 

Thos. De Witt Cuyler. 
" Pittsburgh, 6". P. Harbison. 
" Scranton, H. M. Boies. 
R. I., Peacedale, R. G. Hazard, zd. 

" Providence, H. S. Conant. 
S. C, Charleston, A. T. Jamison. 

" Columbia, A. T. Smythe. 
Tenn., Chattanooga, J. B. Milligan. 
" Knoxville, James H. Cowan. 
" Nashville, James Bowron. 
" " J. B. O'Bryan. 

Texas, Dallas, A. F. Hardie. 

" Fort Worth, Wm. C. Winthrop. 
Vt., Brattleboro, Col. J. J. Estey. 
" Burlington, W. J. Van Patten. 
" Montpelier, A. J. Howe. 
" St. Johnsbury, Col. Franklin Fairbanks. 
Va., Richmond, Joseph Bryan. 
Wash., Seattle, E. C. Kilbourne. 

" Spokane, Walter Hughson. 
Wis., Milwaukee, Geo. J. Rogers. 



*To be filled. Corporators elected declined. 



tDeceased. 



OFFICERS. 



President, Vice-President, 
Rev. DAVID ALLEN REED. H. B. CHAMBERLIN. 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER, pro tem., 

OLIVER C. MORSE. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE : 

R. C. Morse, R. R. McBurney, C. H. Barrows, 

E. F. See, Dr. W. F. Andrews, H. H. Bowman, 
with officers, ex officio. 

auditor : 
H. H. Bowman. 



the control. 

The control of this school is vested in the Trustees, of whom six, with 
the officers ex officio, constitute an Executive Committee. 

The Trustees are chosen by the Corporation, a majority of whom are to 
be nominated by the International Convention of Young Men's Christian 
Associations. The instructors are appointed by the Trustees. 



STUDENTS, 1890-91. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



SENIORS. 



Baldwin, Harry Anderson, 
Corbett, David Watson, 
Cowles, George Burr, 
Fison, Herbert William, 
Fitch, Fred Clyde, 
Fleming, George, 
Lunbeck, Arthur Wilbur* 
McKee, William Charles, 
Medd, Henry, 
Ropes, James Miller, Jr., 
Smith, John Peter, 
Winslow, George Henry, 



New Albany, Ind. 
Montreal, Que. 
New Britain, Conn. 
Peacedale, R. I. 
Keene, N. H. 
San Diego, Cal. 
Warrensburg, Mo. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Salem, Mass. 
Sioux City, Iowa. 
Gilbertville, Mass. 



JUNIORS. 



Bard, Almon Winter, 
Carey, Wilbert Franklin, 
Davis, William Henry, 
Dick, John M., 
Francis, Ebenezer, 
Henderson, John Grant, 
ishikawa, samuern sadakni, 
Kingsbury, Charles Henry, 
Libby, Eugene Samuel, 
Patton, Thomas Duncan, 
Shutts, George Liberty, 
Spence, Donald MacKay, 
Vinson, James, 
Weller, George Radford, 



Brazil, Ind. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Holyoke, Mass. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 
Upper Stewiacke, N. S. 
Hamilton, Ont. 
Tokio, Japan. 
South Killingly, Conn. 
Redlands, Cal. 
Montreal, Que. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Nashua, N. H. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Yonkers, N. Y. 



7 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



SENIORS. 

Ball, William Henry, Jr., Yonkers, N. Y. 

Barton, William Henry, Waltham, Mass. 

Garland, Albert Ellsworth, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Halsted, Alfred Thompson, Paterson, N. J. 

Keller, William Johnson, Springfield, Mass. 

Merwin, Milton Knapp, Utica, N. Y. 

Ninde, William Edward, Rome, N. Y. 



JUNIORS. 



Black, Walter Orlando, 
Bond, Thomas Parsons, 
Driver, James Kemp, 
Exner, Max Joseph, 
Finch, George Hardy, 
Foss, Peter Lenord, 
Macartney, John William, 
Syrett, Edgar Charles, 
Van Leuven, Byron, 



Grand Ridge, 111. 
Cassopolis, Mich. 
Galesburg, 111. 
Seattle, Washington. 
Peoria, 111. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Springfield, Mass. 
San Bernardino, Cal. 



ONE YEAR'S COURSE. 

Berry, Walter Durant, Worcester, Mass. 

Naismith, James, Almonte, Ontario. 

Stockwell, Albert Pike, Aurora, 111. 

Stagg, Amos Alonzo, West Orange, N. J. 



GENERAL COURSE. 



INSTRUCTORS. 

Rev. D. A. Reed, 734 State Street, 

O. C. Morse, 219 Florida Street, 

Systematic Bible Truth and Ethics. 



Rev. T. H. Hawks, D.D., 626 Worthington Street, 

Bible History, Exegesis, and Church History. 



Rev. S. L. Merrell, 144 Buckingham Street, 

Rhetoric and Logic. 



Rev. E. P. Armstrong, 60 Sherman Street, 

Vocal Music. 



The General Course of instruction is largely common to the students 
of both departments.* It covers two years, and includes the following 
topics : — 

Bible History and Exegesis. 

The History of Evangelical Christianity. 

Christian Evidences. 

Old and New Testament Canon. 

Fundamental Doctrines of the Bible. 

Books of the Bible. 

Christian Ethics. 

Outline Study of Man. 

Practical Methods of Christian Work. 

Rules for Deliberative Bodies. 

Rhetoric and Logic. 

Vocal Music. 

*See Schedule on pages 26-27. 



8 



9 



OUTLINE OF THE GENERAL COURSE. 



BIBLE HISTORY AND EXEGESIS. 

Junior Year. 

Biblical History (O. T.). 

The Life of Christ. 

Biblical Geography and Chronology. 

Senior , Year. 

History of the Apostolic Church. 

Biblical Geography and Chronology (Continued). 

History of Evangelical Christianity: An outline presentation of its 
progress down to the present time, prominence being given to mis- 
sions and the development of doctrine. 

New Testament Exegesis : Selections from Gospels and Epistles. 

Old Testament Exegesis : Selections from Psalms and Prophets. 

English Versions. 

Introduction. 

Text-books : Dr. Smith's Old and New Testament Histories (Harper's 
Student Series), Fisher's History of the Christian Church; Robinson's 
English Harmony of the Gospels. 

EVIDENCES, CANON, DOCTRINES, BOOKS, ETHICS. 

Junior Year. 

Outline Study of the Evidences of Christianity; The Divine and Human 
Authorship of the Bible, including the Inspiration, Genuineness, and 
Canonicity of the Scriptures ; and the Fundamental Doctrines held in com- 
mon by evangelical denominations. 

Study of the books of the Bible, with reference to the following topics : 
(i) The great divisions of each book ; (2) the great historical facts ; (3 )the 
great religious facts ; (4) the great characters ; (5) the great types and their 
development in the other books ; (6) the great prophecies and promises, and 
their fulfillment; (7) practical lessons. Special attention will be paid, all 
through this course, to the great doctrines previously studied in outline, as 
they are developed in each book. 

Senior Year. 

Study of the books of the Bible (Continued). Christian Ethics, or the 
Scripture teaching concerning the duties of man as a free moral agent. 



10 



OUTLINE STUDY OF MAN. 

Senior Year. 

Text-book : Dr. Mark Hopkins' Outline Study of Man. 

METHODS OF CHRISTIAN WORK, 

under the following heads, receive special attention throughout the entire 
course : The Prayer Meeting and its Methods ; How to Study and Use the 
Bible ; How to deal with Inquirers ; The Workers' Training Class ; The 
Literary Society. 

RHETORIC AND LOGIC. 

Rhetoric is taught during the Junior and Logic during the Senior year. 
Written compositions are required of all once in three weeks during the 
entire course. Practice in extempore speaking required by all. 

Text-book in Rhetoric: A Manual of Composition and Rhetoric by Jno. 
S. Hart, LL.D. (Eldridge & Bro., Philadelphia). 

RULES FOR DELIBERATIVE BODIES. 

Taught in connection with the literary societies. Manual, Roberts 
"Rules of Order." 

VOCAL MUSIC 

is taught in the Junior year to prepare the student to lead in devotional 
singing. 



INTERNATIONAL 
YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
TRAINING SCHOOL, 
SPRINGFIELD, MASS., U. S. A. 



i iic Le3RAR¥ Ms v.., 
AFR •> 196! 
UHWBRITY OF H !|!iBI$ 



SIXTH CATALOGUE 
1890-91. 



CONTENTS. 



Admission, Terms of — Regular School, 28 i 

" " Correspondence School, 31, 32 

" " Summer School, 

Bequest, Forms for Outside back cover 

Calendar for 1891-92, 3 

Contributions, How made, etc., Outside back caver 

Corporation, . . 4 

Correspondence School — Secretarial Department, . . . 30, 31 

" " Physical " ..... 31, 32 

Design, . . .... 2 

Expenses, Estimate of — Regular School, 29 

" " Correspondence School, 31, 32 

" " Summer School, 40 

General Course of Study — Regular School, ...... 8-10 

Graduation, Conditions of, 27 

Information, How to Get It, ........ 40 

Instructors, Regular School — General Course, 8 

" " " Secretarial Department, ... 11 

" " Physical " .... 17, 18 

" Summer School, ... . . . . . . . 33 

Officers, .............. 5 

Physical Department — Two Years' Course, 17-23 

" " Post-graduate Course, 23 

" " Elementary Course, ...... 24 

" " Correspondence School, 31, 32 

Promotions, Conditions of 27 

Rooms and Bedding, 28 

Schedule of Class Work — Regular School, 26, 27 

" " " Summer School, . . . Inside back caver 

Secretarial Department — Two Years' Course, 11-16 

" " Special Lectures, 16 

" " Correspondence School, . . . 30, 31 

Students — Regular School, 1890-91, . : _ 6, 7 

" Summer School, 1890, 34, 35 

Summer School, 33-4° 

" " Special Lectures, . . 34 

" " Courses of Study in 36-38 

Tuition (see Expenses above). 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



Object : Training for the special duties of the General Secretaryship. 



DEPARTMENT INSTRUCTORS. 



J. T. Bowne, Superintendent, 
F. W. Meyer, 



35 Clarendon Street. 
998 State Street. 



DEPARTMENT COURSE OF STUDY 



FIRST DIVISION— The Field, Objects, and History. 

/. The Field and Its Limits : 

(A) The Work— why needed; (B) A Definite Work— for and by 
young men ; (C) The Work Distinctively Religious ; (D) Relation 
to the Church ; (E) Relation to Other Religious Societies. 
//. Summary of the Objects and Work : 

(A) The Means Employed in Cities ; (B) The Means employed in 
Small Towns. 

III. History of the Rise and Growth of the Institution : 

Origin of the Present Movement ; Earlier Attempts ; Introduction 
into America and Work Prior to the Civil War; Army Work; 
Resumption of Home Work ; Development of the International 
Work and its Departments ; Outgrowths of the Work. 

SECOND DIVISION— The Organization and its Home. 

/. Organization : « 
(A) When and How to Organize ; (B) Practical Hints. 

II. The Constitution. 

III. Branches and Sub-Organizations. 

IV. The Management : 

(A) The Directors; (B) The Officers. 

*This is in addition to the whole of the General Course outlined on pages 8-10 and covers two 
years. See also Schedule of Class Work by departments on pages 26-27. 



I I 



12 



V. Standing Committees : 

(A) Importance, Enlistment, and Composition ; (B) How to Organize, 
etc. ; (C) Principles and Methods of Construction ; (D) Names and 
Duties. 

VI. Membership-. 

(A) Classes of Membership ; (B) How to Secure Members ; (C) The 
Membership Committee ; (D) How to Retain Members ; (E) Mis- 
cellaneous. 

VII. Membership Continued : 

(A) The Development of Active Members ; (B) The Associate Mem- 
bership and its Relations ; (C) The Members' Meeting, or Recep- 
tion. 

VIII. The General Secretary : 

(A) The Office and Work ; (B) The Qualifications. 
/ X. The General Secretary — His Relationships : 

(A) To Churches and Pastors ; (B) To Officers, Directors, and Com- 
mittees ; (C) To Other Employees ; (D) To the Members ; (E) To 
the Religious Work; (F) To the Business Community; (G) To his 
Fellow Secretaries. 
X. The General Secretary — Personal Hints : 

i, The Beginner; 2, 44 Secretarialism " ; 3, The Press; 4, Correspond- 
ence ; 5, The Memorandum Book ; 6, Statistics ; 7, Prominent 
Visitors; 8; Growth; 9, Health; 10, Dress; II, Conversation; 12, 
Economy; 13, The Other Sex; 14, Human Nature ; 15, Spiritual 
Life; 16, System; 17, Finances; 18, Accepting a Call. 
XI Securing and Training Secretaries : 

(A) Demand and Supply ; (B) Methods of Training— (1) conferences ; 
(2) institutes, (3) apprenticeship, (4) training schools. 

XII. The A ssociation Home : 

(A) Advantages of Owning a Building ; (B) Location ; (C) Arrange- 
ment ; (D) Equipment. 

XIII. The Care of the Home : 

(A) General Principles; (B) Repairs; (C) Safety; (D) Order and 
Cleanliness. 

XI V. How to get a Buildiiig : 

(A) Preparatory Work; (B) Plan of a Canvass; (C) Hints and Cautions. 

XV. The Building Movement : 
Its Beginning and Growth. 

THIRD DIVISION— Methods of Work* 

/. Current Fi?za?ices : 

(A) Ways and Means, — (1) annual budget, (2) sources of income, (3) 
solicitation; (B) Collections and Disbursements; (C) Financial 
Book-keeping. * 

♦Methods of Work will be very fully illustrated by approved records, blanks, and printed matter. 



13 



//. Real Estate and Endowment Funds : 

(A) Incorporation ; (B) Trustees ; (C) Endowments ; (D) Debt, Taxes, 
Insurance, and Leases. 

III. Records and Public Presentation of the Work : 

(A) Records and Statistics ; (B) Anniversaries ; (C) The Parlor Con- 
ference ; (D) Printed Matter — (i) the bulletin, (2) annual reports, etc. 

IV. Information and Relief : 

(A) Boarding Houses ; (B) The Employment Bureau ; (C) Savings 
* Bureau; (D) Benefit Fund; (E) Visiting the Sick; (F) Destitute 
Young Men. 

V. The Bible in Association Work: 

(A) Individual Study — methods and helps; (B) Class Study — (1) a 
Bible class indispensable, (2) relation of the general secretary, (3) 
principal divisions, (4) time, place, and appliances, (5) the teacher, (6) 
the class, (7) the lesson, (8) preparing the lesson, (9) teaching the les- 
son, hints on training classes, Bible marking ; (C) Practical Work 
with the Unconverted — (1) personal work, (2) the evangelistic Bible 
class, (3) the Bible in the evangelistic meeting, Bible readings. 
VI Religious Meetings, etc. : 

(A) The Young Men's Meeting; (B) Other Meetings at the Rooms; 
(C) Religious work Outside the Rooms — (1) work in public institu- 
tions, (2) sermons to young men, (3) distribution of religious reading 
matter, (4) the invitation committee. 

VII. The Place and Value of the Secular Departments. 

VIII. The Educational Department : 

(A) The Reading Room — furniture, supervision, papers and period- 
icals how secured ; (B) The Library* — apartments, classification, 
selection, purchase, and care of books, ways and means ; (C) Edu- 
cational Classes — adaptation to needs of community, instructors, 
class rooms, examinations, etc.; (D) Literary Societies — value, how 
organized and supervised ; (E) Lectures and Talks — use and abuse 
of lectures, " star" and popular courses, arrangements for, practical 
talks. 

IX. The Social Department : 

(A) The Reception Committee ; (B) The Social Rooms ; (C) Social 
Entertainments. 

X. The Physical Department: 

(A) Introductory; (B) Conditions under which a Physical Depart- 
ment should be established ; (C) Equipment and Methods — (1) sci- 
entific, (2) practical ;(D) The Physical Director — (1) qualifications, 
(2) duties. (See course in Gymnastics and Athletics, at the end of 
the Fourth Division, page 14.) 

•Arrangements are in progress for a special course in Association Library Work. 



14 



XI Work for Boys: 

(A) History; (B) Aim and Benefits; (C) Organization; (D) Differ- 
ent Classes ; (E) Methods — (i) religious, (2) educational, (3) social, 
(4) physical. 

XII. Work for Special Classes : 

(A) College Students— (1) history, (2) methods, (3) outgrowths ; (B) 
Railroad Men — (1) history, (2) aim and benefit, (3) organization 
and finance, (4) rooms and methods ; (C) Commercial Travelers — 
the field, work, and agencies ; (D) Other Nationalities — the German 
work, the Colored work, N. A. Indians, etc. ; (E) Miscellaneous 
Classes — soldiers, sailors, deaf mutes, lumbermen, firemen, police- 
men, etc. 

XIII. Women's Work for Young Men : 
Organization and Methods. 

FOURTH DIVISION— General Supervision and Extension. 

/. State and Provi?tcial Work : 

(A) History and Organization ; (B) The State Committee ; (C) The 
Committee's Finances; (D) The State Secretary; (E) The State 
Convention — (1) preparatory work by the state committee, the pro- 
gram, the convention circular, (2) preparatory work by local associ- 
ation, (3) work at the convention ; (F) The District Organization — 
(1) methods of organization, committee, etc., (2) conferences and 
visitation, (3) corresponding members. 

II. The American hitemational Work: 

(A) History and Organization ; (B) Field and Work ; (C) Paid Agents; 
(D) Corresponding Members; (E) International Convention; (F) 
Day and Week of Prayer ; (G) Finances. 

III. The Central International Committee : 
History, Organization, and Work. 

Text-book: " Hand-book of the History, Organization, and Methods of 
Work of Young Men's Christian Associations." This book was prepared 
especially for the use of this department. 

During the entire course the students will have access to the Historical 
Library of the Young Men's Christian Associations, and will also be required 
to engage in special courses of reading in connection with the department 
work. 

GYMNASTICS AND ATHLETICS. 
It is the purpose of this course to give each student in the Secretarial 
Department a practical knowledge of this work, that will enable him intelli- 
gently to direct a small gymnasium. A sufficient amount of theory will be 
given to insure the intelligent appreciation of the field. The prescription 
of exercise, physical diagnosis, and kindred subjects will not be treated of, 
as experience has shown that a smattering in these lines is a dangerous 



5 



thing. Each student will receive a physical examination, and work will be 
prescribed that will, as far as possible, put him in the best condition for 
study and future work. 

Theory. — Elementary anatomy, physiology, and hygiene. 

In connection with these subjects will be taken up the philosophy of 
the different gymnastic systems, and the theory of massage. 

First aid to injured. 

Lectures on history of physical education, effect of body on the mind, 
literature of physical education. 

Measurements, how taken and used. 

Purity, scientific basis and methods of work for its advancement. 
Practice. — Calisthenics. Use of developing apparatus. 
Light Gymnastics, including dumb bells, wands, Indian clubs, etc. 
Heavy Gymnastics : vaulting, horizontal and parallel bars, horse, buck, 

etc. 

Athletics : walking, running, jumping, throwing the hammer, putting the 
shot, pole vaulting, base ball, foot ball, lawn tennis. 

Class work especially adapted to the needs of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Associations, on all of the apparatus, will be committed by the students. 

Note : — In a number of instances attempts have been made to have the Assistant Secretary 
conduct the physical department. This is not so desirable as for the General Secretary himself to do 
it, having an assistant to relieve him in the general work of the Association in order that he may 
have the time. Work in the physical department gives the Secretary an opportunity to become 
acquainted with the associate membership such as is not afforded by any other department. It also 
involves his taking exercise that is necessary for his own well-being, and puts him before his 
membership in a desirable light. The fundamental idea of the Association— that it is an association 
and not a one-man-affair — should be kept in mind here as in the other departments. Much can be 
done through the development of leaders, so that where the Secretary is directing the gymnasium, 
he ought after a time to be obliged to conduct only a leaders' class, all the other classes being led by 
the men whom he has trained. This is the simple application of the committee idea to the 
physical department. 

DEPARTMENT PRACTICE. 

The Associations of Springfield were consolidated on the metropolitan 
plan during the past year, thus offering added advantages for practically 
illustrating this system. 

During the whole of the Junior Year, all students in this department are 
required to be members of the Armory Hill Branch of the local Associa- 
tion ; to do regular practical work on one or more of its standing commit- 
tees ; and to attend all stated meetings of the committees to which appointed. , 

During the Senior Year, the same must be done in connection with the 
Central Branch unless the student is preparing especially for Railroad 
work, when he will be required to unite and work with the Railroad Branch. 

All are given practice in preparing monthly reports of committees, min- 
utes of meetings, items for newspapers and bulletins, printer's copy, and 
proof reading ; and are expected to attend each year at least two Association 
Conventions. The instructors decline to grant leave of absence to attend 
conventions other than those prescribed in the Department Course. 



SPECIAL LECTURES AND CONFERENCES. 



Special lectures by Association Workers of large experience run 
through the entire course. The following were given in 1890-1891 : 

1. April 24, 1890.— F. K. Sanders, Editor of " Intercollegian." "The 
Relation of the local Secretary to College men and College Associations." 

2. April 25. — Geo. A. Warburton, Secretary Railroad Branch, N. Y. 
City. " How to give an Acceptable Public Address." 

3. May 20. — Henry Bond, Waltham, Mass. " Essentials to Business 
Success." 

4. Dec. 2. — S. M. Sayford, " Hindrances to Success in Christian Work " 

5. Dec. 3. — J. R. Mott, College Secretary of the International Com- 
mittee. " The Student Volunteer Movement." 

6. Dec. 7. — H. B. Chamberlin, Denver, Colorado. " Privileges of Lay- 
men." 

7. Dec. 10.— G. K. Shurtleff, General Secretary, Utica, N. Y. "Busi- 
ness Management." 

8. January 9, 1891. — R. M. Armstrong, State Secretary of Massachu- 
setts. " The Managers — kind of men needed, etc." 

9. March 13. — Richard C. Morse, General Secretary of the International 
Committee. " The Influence of American Associations upon Association 
work in other lands." 

10. March 17. — P. A. Wieting, Secretary of the International Commit- 
tee. " Some ways in which a General Secretary may aid the International 
Committee in its office work." 

11. April 1. — Thomas Cochran of St. Paul, Minnesota. "Business 
Requisites in the General Secretary." 

12. April 21. — Frank W. Ober, General Secretary, Albany, N. Y. 
" Summer Camping." 

13. May 19. — E. L. Loudon, of the International Committee, "Work 
by and among Commercial Travelers." 

April 9-12. — The Eastern Intercollegiate Deputation Conference met in 
the school building. By courtesy the sessions were open to our students, 
enabling them to acquire a very comprehensive knowledge of the purposes 
and methods of College Association Work. 



For Elementary Course, see page 24. 

For Correspondence Course, see pages 30-32. 

For Summer Course, see pages 33-38. 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



MOTTO— E Tribus Unum. 



Object : Training for the special duties of Physical Directors. 



The whole work of this department is founded on a few general princi- 
ples, and all the studies are considered with reference to those principles. 
These principles are : — 

/. Unity. 

Man is a unit : body, mind, and soul forming one complete whole, 
neither complete without the others. 

II. Law of Symmetry. 

The best results can be secured only when man as a whole is sym- 
metrically developed, not merely each nature with reference to 
itself, but each nature in relation to the others. 

III. " Functioji makes Structure.'''' 

The doing of a thing tends to increase the ability to do that thing. 
Thus, doing all-round exercises, those which demand symmetrical bodies, 
tends to produce symmetry. 



DEPARTMENT INSTRUCTORS. 

Luther Gulick, M.D., Supt. of Dept., 153 Westminster street. 

Psychology, History and Philosophy of Physical Exercise, Anthropometry. 

F. N. Seerley, 33 Pendleton avenue. 

Applied Physiology and Hygiene. 

James Naismith, A.B., 786 State street. 

Animal Mechanics, Including Physics and Anatomy. 

R. A. Clark, A.B., 786 State street. 

Physical Examination and Prescription j First Aid. 

17 



i8 

A. A. Stagg, A.B. (Special Instructor), 23 Hawley street. 

Training : Foot ball; Base ball. 

Mary L. Janes, Librarian, 81 Eastern avenue. 

Library and Literature of Physical Educatio?i. 

The instruction in the field and gymnasium will be divided among the 
several instructors. 

The same instructors will have charge of the Correspondence Course. 



REGULAR COURSE.— TWO YEARS. 



THEORY. 

Arranged according to subjects rather than by terms. 

Animal Mechanics. — Based on physics and anatomy. Elemen- 
tary Physics, Balfour Stewart. Energy, Mechanical Powers, Study of 
the Lever. Gray's Anatomy. Osteology, pp. 220-295. Articulation, 
Lectures, Myology, pp. 362-487. Lectures on combined action of 
muscles in gymnastics and athletics. Mechanism of bodily move- 
ments. Study of relations and insertions of muscles to power and 
speed. Relation of length of levers to capacity for different sports. 
Study of individuals as to muscular origin and insertion. 

Physiology. — Martin's " Human Body." (Large edition.) For 
reference, Landois and Stirling, Foster, Kirke, Yeo. Especial attention 
will be given to the following : Structure of motor organs. Structure 
of muscle, muscular growth. Causes affecting growth. Physiology of 
muscle. Muscular fatigue and exhaustion. Muscular training, stiff ness, 
and rest. Local effects of exercise on muscle. Effects of massage on 
muscle. Physiology of the nervous system. Effects of the different 
kinds of exercise on the brain, spinal cord, and nerves. Effects of 
exercise on circulatory apparatus. " Wind " in training. Alteration 
of weight by exercise. Waste products of exercise. Energy-yielding 
foods. Muscle-building foods. Functions of brain and spinal cord. 
Special lectures on sight and the " subjective functions of the nervous 
system " will indicate the nature and method of the modern physiolog- 
ical psychology. 

Hygiene. — Text-book of Hygiene, Wilson. With especial ref- 
erence to the following : Duration of life. Causes of disease : heredity, 
use and abuse of stimulants, tobacco, abuses of eating, mental worry, 
immorality, late hours. Food and diet. Cleanliness : baths and bath- 



i9 

ing. Clothing ; material, fashion, pressure. Habitations : ventilation, 
sanitary appliances, disinfection, hygiene of employment. 

Massage. — Massage as a mode of treatment, Murrell. General 
principles as applied to development and training. Massage of sprains 
and strains. Medical massage is not included. 

Personal Purity. — Physiology of the reproductive organs. 
Effects of violation of the laws of purity ; on the body, on the mind. 
Intellectual licentiousness \ cause, effects. Hygienic treatment. 
Quack doctors and their methods. 

First Aid to the Injured. — Hand-book of First Aid, Morton. 
Additional lecture on the treatment of sprains, muscular strains, and 
bruises. The use of bandaging for weak joints and the treatment of 
every day wounds. 

Physical Examination. — Physical Diagnosis, Page. Diseases 
and sequelae most frequently met with in the examining room. Aus- 
cultation, percussion. The use of inspection will be emphasized. The 
rudiments of the examination of the eyes and ears. 

Sphygmography. — The use of the sphygmograph in health. Each 
student will supply himself with a Dudgeon sphygmograph. The 
causation of the different elements of the tracings. Work and rest of 
the heart and arteries ; influence of cold, heat, gravity, compression, 
tea, coffee, tobacco, and stimulants. Each student will prepare in 
essay form a report of the experiments conducted by himself on some 
problem that shall be given him. The scientific or inductive method 
of study will here receive attention, the design being to conduct orig- 
inal scientific investigations by correct principles, and also to enable 
him to recognize correct and incorrect inductions. 

Photography. — Instantaneous photography of athletic work. Ste- 
reopticon slides. Time pictures of unusual cases in office. Flash 
light photography. Each student will supply his own outfit. 

Gymnastic Therapeutics. — Underlying principles of the sub- 
ject rather than the details of application. The treatment of spinal 
curvature, functional cardiac difficulties, neurasthenia, general debility. 

Anthropometry. — Use of anthropometric apparatus. Measure- 
ments ; how taken, preserved, and used. 

Young Men's Christian Association. — The students in this 
department will be expected to cover during the Junior year an 
abridged course of eighty lessons in Young Men's Christian Associa- 



20 



tion work based upon the outline of the Secretarial Department, on 
pages 11-14. 

Physical Department. — a. Fundamental basis and relation to 
other departments, b. Conditions for : demand, gymnasium commit- 
tee, leader, place, c. Methods and equipment : number of classes, 
leaders, and leaders' corps, visitors. Scientific (office) : Physical 
examination, prescription, measurements, personal purity. Practical 
(gymnasium, field) : kinds of exercise, exhibitions, competitions. d. 
Religious work : personal, Bible training class, e. Physical Director : 
Qualifications, spiritual, mental, physical ; training ; duties. 

Literature of Physical Education. — The following books, 
will be read by the students and discussed in the class-room : How 
to get Strong, Blaikie; Sound Bodies for our Boys and Girls, Blaikie; 
Physical Education, Maclaren; Walker's Manly Exercise, " Craven "j 
Brawn and Brain, Aldridgej Physical Culture for Home and School, 
Dowd; Health by Exercise, Taylor; Physical Exercise, Wood; 
Athletics and Foot ball, Shearman; New Gymnastics for Men, Women, 
and Children, Lewis; Education, Spencer; Indian Club Exercises, 
Kehoe; British Sports and Pastimes, Trollope; Gymnastics for the 
Fingers and Wrists, Ward- Jackson; Exercise and Training, Their 
Effect on Health, Lee; University Oars, Morgan; Physical Education, 
Roth ; The Brawnville Papers, Tyler; Man, Moral and Physical, 
Jones; Physiology of Bodily Exercise, Lagrange; Swedish Educa- 
tional Gymnastics, Posse; A Manual of Anthropometry, Roberts; 
Out-door Papers, Higginson; An Hour with Delsarte, Morgan; 
Report of Boston Physical Training Conference. 

These papers and pamphlets will also be studied : Anthro- 
pometric Manual, Amherst College, Hitchcock and Seeley; The 
Physical Proportions of the Typical Man, Sargent; The Anatomy 
of the Contortionist, Dwight; Physical Training. Sargent; The 
Influence of Exercise on Health, Richards; The Physical Develop- 
ment of Women, Sargent; Military Drill and Gymnastic Train- 
ing in Physical Culture, Hartwell; Military Drill on Boys, Sargent ; 
Physiology of Exercise, Hartwell; Physical Characteristics of the 
Athlete, Sargent; The Gymnastic Progression, Enebuske; Hygiene for 
Base Ball Players, Leuf. 

The students will have the use of the Library on Physical Educa- 
tion. This has been built up mostly by the contributions of physical 
directors throughout the country, and, with the exception possibly of 
some private collections, is the largest library in our language on this 



21 



subject. It contains upwards of three hundred volumes and nearly as 
many pamphlets, some of which are rare and valuable, besides files and 
current numbers of magazines. A subject index of the whole will 
render available what has not hitherto been of service. 

PRACTICE. 

Believing that as far as possible a teacher should have a knowledge 
of the whole subject, and not merely of that part that he is to teach, 
the course in this department has been made as far as possible a 
complete one, thus of necessity including a good deal that the students 
will not . be called upon to use, but which will nevertheless give them 
valuable knowledge and training. , It is important that a man who is to 
teach Caesar should have read more Latin than is contained in Caesar j 
he should be familiar with the Latin language as a whole. Thus 
wrestling and boxing are introduced into this course, not with the idea 
that our pupils are to teach these things, but because they are integral 
parts of the subject, and every one who wishes to master the field of 
gymnastics should know about them. 

The method of instruction in gymnastics and athletics is analytic 
and synthetic. It is called analytic because each exercise is analyzed 
into the elementary movements of which it is composed. It is 
synthetic because after learning these elementary movements, they are 
gradually combined to form the exercise first shown. The student is 
thus led both to a thorough appreciation and comprehension of the 
exercise as a whole, and to its intelligent performance. 

Although it is desired to give the student as wide a range of prac- 
tice as possible, still it is deemed unwise to attempt any work of a 
hazardous nature. 

Special attention will be given to the building up of the weak parts 
of the student, and the development of a strong, erect, symmetrical, 
and graceful figure. Two hours a day will be given to practice through- 
out both years. 

Gymnastics. — Junior Year. Calisthenics. Use of Developing 
Apparatus : Chest weight, floor and overhead pulleys, etc. Light 
Gymnastics, Elementary, Dumb bells, Indian clubs, wands. Heavy 
Gymnastics, Elementary : Vaulting bar, horizontal bar, parallel bars, 
horse, buck. 

Senior Year. Sparring ; Wrestling ; Fencing ; Normal work, lead- 
ing of classes, etc. Light Gymnastics : Dumb bells, Indian clubs, 
wands. Heavy Gymnastics ; Vaulting bar, horizontal bar, parallel bars, 
horse, buck. 



22 



Pedagogy. — Attention will be given to the art of teaching. Each 
student will be given practice in the actual leading of classes. 

Invention of Exercises. — Especial attention will be given to the 
construction of gymnastic drills to meet especial cases and classes. 
Each student will be required to prepare and submit such drills to .the 
instructors. 

Athletics. — Believing that athletics in their various forms are 
destined, on account of their superior hygienic, educational, and rec- 
reative value, to receive a far larger share of attention from the 
Associations than they have as yet secured, this work is placed in the 
curriculum on the same plane with gymnastics. A field for athletics 
has just been purchased and will be fitted up at once with the necessary 
appliances. Seven acres are to be given exclusively to this purpose. 
Land adjoining, also owned by the school, will afford additional oppor- 
tunity for practice in foot ball, la crosse, etc., when the regular grounds 
are occupied. Especial emphasis will be laid on the Pentathlon, or 
five -fold contest, consisting of the ioo-yard dash, running high jump, 
throwing 12-pound hammer, pole vault, and mile run. This will form 
the chief basis of the estimate of the students' standing in athletics. 

Aquatics. — Unusual facilities are offered for rowing by the Con- 
necticut river. Two, four, and six oared gigs will give students the 
opportunity for practice. 

Each student will learn to swim in the various styles, and will be 
taught methods for rescuing and restoring the drowning. 

During the Junior year, all students of this department are required 
to be members of the Armory Hill Branch of the local Association, to 
do regular practical work on one of its standing committees ; and to 
attend all stated meetings of the committee to which appointed. 
During the Senior year the same must be done in connection with the 
Central Branch. 

They will also be expected during the course to visit the large 
gymnasiums of either Boston or New York and that of either Harvard, 
Yale, or Amherst, and to attend the annual meeting of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Physical Education, unless held at 
too remote a locality ; also to attend each year one State or Inter- 
national Convention of the Young Men's Christian Associations. 

Of the general course on pages 8-10, the students in this depart- 
ment take Systematic Bible Truth, Exegesis, Training Class work, 
Prayer Meeting Talks, and Literary Society, omitting Vocal Music, 
Rhetoric, Bible History, and Church History. It will thus allow two 



23 

hours a day for department work, one for practice, and one for theory. 
An average of three hours daily will be necessary in preparation for 
each recitation in theory. See schedule of Class Room Work on 
pages 26-27. 



POST GRADUATE COURSE. 



A post graduate course of one year will be offered next fall. It 
has been found that there are those who are desirous of pursuing the 
studies in this field further than is possible in the two years' course. 
The seminary method will be adopted, discussion taking the place of 
lecture and recitation. 

Physiological Psychology. — " Psychology " by William James, 
professor of this subject at Harvard University, will be used as a basis 
of discussion. Particular attention will be given to the influence and 
effects of body on mind, growth of mind in children, development of 
mind in the weak-minded. 

History and Philosophy of Physical Education. — The design 
of this study is to give the student a clear knowledge of the work that 
has been done along these lines. The fundamental principles and 
aims of each system will be studied. The athletics of the Greeks, 
influence on national life, the " Pentathlon " j German gymnastics, life 
of Jahn, the Turners and their place in the Napoleonic war, Turnverein, 
school gymnastics, miltiary gymnastics ; gymnastics in Sweden, Ling 
and his work, Royal Gymnastic Institute at Stockholm, Swedish 
" movement cure " ; the renaissance of athletics in France, life and 
work of Delsarte ; English athletics ; physical education in America ; 
history of physical department of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation. 

Anthropometry. — Bodily measurement charts and their math- 
ematical basis ; the " percentile " method of Sir Francis Galton, the 
"physical height of a unit" method of Dr. Hitchcock, the ordinary 
" average " method, an original method on the basis of the " mean." 
Typical versus perfect form. Proper use of anthropometric charts, 
fallacies involved in some of them. Each student will prepare a chart 
according to each method presented from statistics furnished by the 
department. Tests for keenness of eyesight, speed of blood, rapidity 
of reflex action, — original work will be carried on in regard to the 



2 4 



relation of these and similar tests to the capacity of the individual for 
mental and physical work of different classes. Characteristics of differ- 
ent classes of gymnasts and athletes. Selection of men for competi- 
tive sports according to their physical characteristics. The investiga- 
tions of M. Quetelet. 

Literature of Physical Education. — Discussions will be 
carried on as during the senior year, taking up the following works : — 

Salzman's Gymnastics for Youth ; Physical Education, Roth ; Sys- 
tematic Training of the Body, Schaible ; Physical Training in Amer- 
ican Colleges, Hartwell ; Swedish Educational Gymnastics, Posse; 
Exercise and Training, their Effect upon Health, Lee; University 
Oars, Morgan; Anatomy of the Contortionist, Dwight ; Physical 
Development of Women, Sargent ; Effects of Military Drill upon Boys, 
Sargent ; Physical Characteristics of the Athlete, Sargent ; Natural 
Inheritance, Galton; Inquiries into Human Faculty, Galton ; Mem- 
ory, Key ; Influence of Mind on Body, Take ; Proceedings American 
Association Advancement Physical Education. 

Thesis. — Each student shall present a thesis of not less than three 
thousand words embodying the results of original investigations upon 
a subject approved by the faculty. After delivery, this thesis shall 
become the property of the physical department library. 

Candidates must be graduates of the regular course, or have a 
training which will be received as equivalent by the instructors. 
Tuition will be the same as for the regular course. 



ELEMENTARY COURSE OF ONE YEAR. 



It has been found that the one month's training that has been 
given in the summer schools is entirely unsatisfactory as a short prep- 
aration for the work. Accordingly, an elementary course of one year 
has been arranged for those who are unable to take the complete 
course. This will be the same course in theory in the physical depart- 
ment that is given to the students in the secretarial department (see p. 
15). These one year men will also have the same course in secretarial 
work that is given to the regular physical department students (see 
foot of page 19). In gymnastics and athletics they will practice with 
the students of the Junior class. In addition these students will take 



25 



the work of the Training Class, Literary Society, Prayer Meeting 
Talks, and Systematic Bible Truth. 

This course will be desirable for students who find it necessary 
to combine the duties of Assistant Secretary and Physical Director. 
See note on page 15. 



For Correspondence Course, see pages 30-32. 



For Summer Course, see pages 33-38. 



26 



SCHEDULE OF CLASS WORK 

(liable to change.) 
JUNIORS. 







Secretarial Department. 


Physical Department. 


Monday. 


8.30 a. m. 
9.30 " 
10.30 " 
2.00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Rhetoric. 

*Vocal Music or Physiology. 
Bible History. 


Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 


Wednesday, j Tuesday. 


8.30 a. m. 
9.30 " 
10.30 " 
3.00 p. m. 
4.00 " 
7-30 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

Rhetoric. 

Bible History. 
Junior Training Class. 


Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 

Junior Training Class. 


8.30 a. m. 
9.30 " 
10.30 " 
2 00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

Department Work. 

*Vocal Music or Physiology. 

Bible History. 


Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 

Y. M. C. A. Work. 


Friday. | Thursday. 


8.30 a. m. 

9-30 " 
10.30 « 
2.00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

Department Work. 

^Vocal IVIusic or Physiology. 


Systematic Bible Truth. 
Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 

Y. M. C. A. Work. 


8.30 a. m. 

9-30 " 
10.30 " 
2.00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Department Work. 

*Vocal Music or Physiology. 

Prayer Meeting Talks and Liter- 
ary Societies. 


Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 

P M. T. and L. S, 



♦Vocal Music during first term ; Physiology during second and third terms. 

All students are expected to attend daily prayers at 5 p. m. and to furnish 
original compositions once in three weeks. Secretarial students practice daily in 
the Physical Department at 11.45- a. m - 



27 



BY DEPARTMENTS. 

(liable to change.) 
SENIORS. 







Secretarial Department. 


Physical Department. 


Monday. 


8.30 a. m. 
930 " 
10.30 " 
2.00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Department Work. 
*Physiology or Study of Man. 
Church History. 


Department Theory. 
Department Practice. 


Thursday. | Wednesday. | Tuesday. 


8.30 a. m. 
9.30 " 
10.30 " 
3.00 p. m. 
4 00 " 
7.30 « 


Department Work. 
Exegesis. 

Senior Training Class. 


Department Theory. 
Exegesis. 

Department Practice. 
Senior Training Class. 


8.30 a. m. 
9.30 u 
10.30 «' 
2.00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

^Physiology or Study of Man. 
Exegesis. 


Department Theory. 
Systematic Bible Truth. 

Exegesis. 

Department Practice. 


8.30 a. m. 

9-30 ;; 
10.30 

2.00 p. m. 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 

*Physiology or Study of Man. 

Exegesis. 

Church History. 


Department Theory. 
Systematic Bible Truth. 

Exegesis. 

Department Practice. 


Friday. 


8.30 a. m. 
9-30 " 
10.30 " 
2.00 p. m, 
3.00 " 
4.00 " 


Systematic Bible Truth. 
Church History. 

Prayer Meeting Talks and Liter- 
ary Societies. 


Department Theory. 
Systematic Bible Truth. 

Department Practice. 
P. M. T. and L. S. 



♦Physiology during first term ; Outline Study of Man during second and third terms. 

A Junior shall be eligible for promotion only after passing satisfactorily in every 
study of the first year, and upon recommendation of the department superintendent. 

A Senior shall be eligible for graduation only after passing satisfactorily in 
every study of the course and upon recommendation of the department superinten- 
dent. 



28 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 



The Association Training School is open only to Christian young 
men, over eighteen years of age, who have already shown ability in the 
direction of the work for which they wish to prepare. Each applicant 
shall be a member in good standing of an evangelical church, and if 
admitted shall bring a certificate to this effect and unite with some 
church of his choice in this city. 

Each applicant for admission shall give'evidence of having had at 
least a fair English education. If a graduate of a college or high 
school, he shall, upon entering, show his certificate of graduation; if 
not, he must, before he can be accepted, pass a preliminary examina- 
tion. Business experience is very desirable. 

Several weeks are sometimes required in making a thorough in- 
vestigation, hence the desirability of making application as early as 
possible. Only after satisfactory reports are received can any 
student be admitted to the' v school. The school year begins with the 
first Wednesday in September. Students who enter for one year, or 
the course, will not be admitted after the last of September. In ex- 
treme cases men will be admitted for a part of a year, but nothing 
aside from the regular work is promised to such. 

It will be greatly to the advantage of all to enter at the beginning 
of the year, and too much emphasis cannot be laid upon the impor- 
tance of taking the entire course. 

Each shall give at least one week's notice if for any reason he 
wishes to leave the school before the end of the year. 

Each is received upon probation; and when it becomes clearly 
evident that the prerequisites for success are wanting, he will no 
longer be retained in the school. 

Each student who has not already done so is urged to read care- 
fully, in advance of his coming, "The Student's Manual" by Rev. John 
Todd. 



ROOMS. 



Each student lodging in the building will care for his own room, 
which must be kept scrupulously clean. He will be expected to provide 
sheets, pillow and bolster slips, towels, and soap. Beds are all single, 3 
feet in width; pillows, 18 x 26 inches; bolsters, 18 x 36 inches. 
Rooms are liable to weekly inspection. 



29 



ESTIMATE OF EXPENSES 

FOR THE SCHOOL YEAR OF FORTY WEEKS. 



The following table is based upon the experience of 1890-91. 

Secretarial Physical 
Department. Department. 



Table board, 


$130 


to 5 


M50 


$130 to $150 


Furnished room with light and heat, 


40 


«( 


55 


40 " 


55 


Tuition, 


50 


<( 


50 


50 " 


50 


Gymnasium suits,* 


6 


u 


10 


25 " 


4of 


Washing, 


12 


u 


20 


12 " 


20 


Text and note books, 


12 


it 


20 


20 " 


35 


Conventions, 


15 


tl 


18 


15 « 


25 


Full membership in local Association, 


2 




2 


2 " 


2 


Sphygmograph and photography, 








50 " 


75 




267 


to 


325 


344 to 


452 



The ABOVE ESTIMATE covers only the items specified, and not 

OTHER NECESSARY INCIDENTALS, WHICH EACH MUST CALCULATE FOR 
HIMSELF. 



The expenses of transients vary from $6.00 to $7.00 per week. 

Only forty-four students can be lodged in the present building, and 
rooms are assigned as the students are accepted ; rooms so assigned, 
unless by special engagement, will not be held more than one day 
after the opening of the term. Furnished rooms outside the building 
cost from $1.25 to $2.00 per week ; table board, from $3.25 to $4.00 
per week. 

Tuition is payable promptly on the last Mondays in September 
and January, one-half at each payment. Room rent, on last Monday 
in each month. No reduction of rent will be made to a student who 
engages a room and fails to appear at the specified time, nor to one 
who vacates his room less than a month before the close of the school. 
Rent stops only when the room is vacated and the key delivered to 
the janitor. A deposit of twenty-five cents will be required for each 
key to the entrance of the gymnasium. 

Students will save themselves trouble and expense by bringing 
exchange on New York and Boston banks rather than local checks. 

♦Students are advised not to purchase gymnasium or athletic suits before coming to the school, 
as the school has regulation colors and suits which all are expected to wear. 

\Gyntnasiutn. — Long-sleeved jersey, $3.00; pants, $3.00; belt, 50c; shoes, $2. 50. Field. — 
Foot ball suit (including shoes), $8.00; sleeveless jersey, $2.50 ; sweater, $3.50; spiked shoes, 
#4 50; tennis shoes, $2.50 ; running pants, 75c. ; hat, 50c. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSE. 



BEGINNING SEPT. 2, 1891. 



SECRETARIAL DEPARTMENT. 



This is a provision in response to a deeply felt and widely 
expressed need for extending as far as possible the advantages of 
the Secretarial Department. Many have had only a partial training for 
the secretaryship, some none at all, and still others, though recogniz- 
ing their lack and desirous of more thorough preparation, have been 
unable for various causes to obtain it. 

The Correspondence Course will include the whole of the Depart- 
ment Course outlined on pages 11-14 (excepting gymnastics and 
athletics), and not the General Biblical Course outlined on pages 
8-10, and personal contact with both instructors and fellow 
students is necessarily forfeited ; yet, while thus limited, it is possible 
through intelligent direction to obtain much better results than could 
be expected from unaided individual effort. The instructors will be 
the same as in the regular school course. 

The outline will be covered in forty sections of five lessons 
each. The first part, consisting of twenty sections, will embrace the 
"Field, Objects, and History" of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, and " The Organization and its Home " (see pages 11-12). 
The second part will include " Methods of Work," and " General 
Supervision and Extension " (see pages 12-14). "The Hand Book 
of Young Men's Christian Associations " will be used as a text-book. 
By close application of at least one hour a day for five days of the 
week it is believed that the course may be covered within two years. 



3° 



3i 



The method of study embraces written questions, answers, out- 
lines, suggestions, collateral reading and study, papers, reviews, and 
examinations. Each student will receive weekly an outline of work 
with suggestions. Reviews will be required at the completion of the 
first and second parts of the course, and a certificate will be given to 
those passing 70 per cent, in an examination upon the whole. 

Admission. — The Correspondence Course will be limited to those 
already engaged in Association work. While the year begins with the 
first Wednesday in September, yet students may be received at any 
time, but no correspondence concerning the studies will be conducted 
during the summer months ; it is therefore better to commence early 
and avoid the necessary interruption. 

Fees. — An enrollment fee of $5 is required when the student is 
admitted. The tuition fee is $20 for the course ; one-half payable 
when the studies are begun, the other half at the beginning of the 
second part of the course. 

Postage. — Students must enclose stamps each time of writing 
sufficient for return postage. 



PHYSICAL DEPARTMENT. 



The aim will be to meet as far as possible by correspondence the 
needs of those who are unable to come to Springfield, but who desire 
the advantages that are offered here in the direction of a knowledge 
of Physical Education. 

This course is designed for physical directors and assistants ; 
others who are specially fitted to take it may join if approved by 
the instructors. Those who are unable on account of financial 
difficulties to come to the school can avail themselves of this oppor- 
tunity to secure a considerable part of the desired training, and at 
the same time be supporting themselves. Physical directors who 
realize the need of further study along these lines are thus offered 
the desired opportunity. A person able to spend but one year at the 
school could so prepare himself by summer and correspondence 
schools that this year would suffice to complete the course and enable 
him to graduate. 



32 



The work demanded by the course will be considerable. This is 
necessary, as the ground to be covered is large and the knowledge 
needed is thorough. 

The instruction will, of course, be individual ; progress can thus 
be made as slow or as rapid as circumstances may demand or allow. 
It will be found advantageous, however, to give to it not less than two 
hours daily. 

A series of four courses will be arranged for correspondence work. 
Each course will consist of forty sections, each section consisting of 
five lessons, each of which will demand on an average two hours' 
study. The subject matter covered will be the same as that covered 
at the school (for outline see pages 18-22). The same text-books 
will be used. Work will be given out for each day, important points 
noted, and difficulties explained. Directions will be given for carry- 
ing on the experiments which are helpful in such studies as Physiology 
and Physics. 

Those subjects which as yet have no satisfactory text-books and 
which are given in the form of lectures will be written out for the 
use of the students taking the Correspondence Course. 

There will be monthly written examinations. The students of 
this department will have the same privilege of questioning on diffi- 
cult points connected with the subject as have those actually on the 
ground. 

Courses in practice at the Summer School will give the basis for 
the practice that should be carried on during the year. Thus system- 
atic study and regular attendance at the Summer Schools will give a 
knowledge of that which is taught at our school second only to that 
which could be learned by actual attendance. 

Tuition will be twenty-five dollars for each course of forty sections ; 
fifteen payable on registration and ten on completion of each twenty 
sections. All expense for postage will be met by the student. 



FIFTH SUMMER SESSION. 



BOTH SECRETARIAL AND PHYSICAL DEPARTMENTS. 



Opening Sunday afternoon, August 2, and closing Saturday after- 
noon, August 29, 189 1. 

Last year two sessions were held, one at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, 
and the other at Springfield, Mass. Largely increased opportunities 
for advanced work are offered as the result of the consolidation at 
one point, which it is hoped will more than repay the additional 
expense incurred by those coming from a distance. 



INSTRUCTORS. 



PROF. E. I. BOSWORTH * 
(Professor of English Bible, Oberlin Theological Seminary.) 
Bible Study. 

J. T. BOWNE, 
Organization and Methods of Association Work. 

LUTHER GULICK, M.D., 
Athletics and Aquatics. 

F. N. SEERLEY, 
Physiology, Training, Physical Department Management. 

H. F. KALLENBERG, 
Gymnastics, Fencing, Wrestling. 

JAMES NAISMITH, A.B., 
Anthropometry, Swedish System of Gymnastics. 

R. A. CLARK, A.B., 
Physical Examination, Prescription, First Aid. 

J. S. GAYLORD, A.B., 
Delsarte System. 

MARY L. JANES, LIBRARIAN, 
Library and Literature of Physical Education. 

*Prof. Bosworth, who is now taking a special course in the University of Leipsic, Germany, 
will return for the month of August to take charge of the Bible Study. 

33 



34 



SPECIAL LECTURERS. 



Cephas Brainerd, Chairman of International Committee, " The 
Young Men's Christian Association before the War." 

E. Hitchcock, M.D., Professor of Physical Education, Amherst Col- 
lege, " Some Recollections of Leaders in Physical Education and Gym- 
nastics." 

F. H. Bartlett, M.D., Physical Director Twenty-third Street 
Branch, New York City, " Life and Work of Dio Lewis." 

Prof. C. S. Beardslee, Hartford Theological Seminary, " Funda- 
mental Importance of Bible Study." 

J. W. Cook, Asst. State Secretary of Massachusetts Y. M. C. A. 
" Recent Experiences in Financial Management." 

C. D. Scudder, M.D., of New York City, "Purity." 

D. F. More, State Secretary of New Jersey, "Division of Labor; Its 
Importance and the Secretary's Relation thereto." 

O. C. Morse, " Relation of a Student to his Alma Mater." 
Rev. D. A. Reed, " The Breadth of Christian Work." 



STUDENTS IN SUMMER SCHOOL, 1890/ 



(W) Western Section. (B) Both Sections. 



Springfield, Mass. 
Lake Geneva, Wis. 
Watertown, N. Y. 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Davenport, Iowa. 
Hudson, N. Y. 



Berry, W. D., Y. M. C. A. Training School, 
Britt, G. W., (W) General Secretary Y. M. C. A., 
Bursley, C. M., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., 
Caskey, R. J., (W) Principal Collegiate Institute, 
Clark, R. A., A.B., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., 
Clayton, E. R.,(W) Physical Director Y. M. C. A., 
Close, G. H., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., 
Dawson, M. L., D.D.S., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Richmond, Va. 
Frater, F. J., (B) Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Knoxville, Tenn. 
Gebhardt, W. H., (W) Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Pullman, 111. 
Gwin, M. F., (W) Physical Director Y. M. C. A., South Bend, Ind. 
Halsted, A. T., Y. M. C. A. Training School, Springfield, Mass. 
Harris, C. E., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., St. Johnsbury, Vt. 
Harrison, Luke, Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Wheeling, W. Va. 



*The present position and location of students are given as far as possible. No session of the 
Secretarial Department was held in 1890. 



35 

Hoffman, H. C, Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Harrisburg, Pa. 

Hoffman, W. E., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Wilmington, Del. 

Howland, J. A., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Providence, R. I. 

Ingram, H. S., (W) Y. M. C. A. Training School, Chicago, 111. 

Jameson, A. A., (W) Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Augusta, Ga. 

Kable, P. O., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., York, Pa. 

Kinnicutt, W. H., Assistant Secretary Y. M. C. A., New Bedford, Mass. 

Loring, B. T., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Hamilton, Ont. 

Mandeville, H. F., Easthampton, Mass. 

Mangum, C. S., Physical Director University of 

North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

McCurdy, J. H., Assistant Physical Director 

Y. M. C. A., 23d street Branch, New York City. 

Merwin, M. K., Y. M. C. A. Training School, Springfield, Mass. 

Minges, J. A., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Williamsport, Pa. 

Mintzer, G. W., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., 

N. W. Branch, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pentland, J. C M (W) Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Quincy, 111. 

Phillips, E. B., General Secretary Y. M. C. A., Winsted, Conn. 

Ragland, C. D., Teacher Randolph-Macon Acad- 
emy, Bedford City, Va. 

Schenk, John, (W) Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Fresno, Cal. 

Shaw, J. W., (W) Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Joliet, 111. 

Sheriden, M. H., Newburgh, N. Y. 

Smith, G. K., Assistant Secretary Y. M. C. A., Asheville, N. C. 

Slevin, W. H., (W) Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Toledo, Ohio. 

Stockwell, A. P., Physical Director Armory Hill 

Y. M. C. A., Springfield, Mass. 

Stollberg, C. A., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Canton, Ohio. 

Thayer, G. B., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Hartford, Conn. 

Townsend, H. A., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Portland, Oregon. 

Van Campen, A. C, (W) General Secretary Railroad 

Y. M. C. A., Brainerd, Minn. 

Van Ness, E. C, (W) General Secretary Y.M.C.A., Port Huron, Mich. 

Warner, C. P., General Secretary Y. M. C. A., Greensburg, Pa. 

Warner, John, Acting Secretary Y. M. C. A., Millville, N. J. 

Wegener, A. B., (W) Y. M. C. A., Training School, Chicago, 111. 

White, J. H., Physical Director Y. M. C. A., New Brunswick, N. J, 



36 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



Bible Study. — Instructor, E. I. Bosworth. 

Twenty-four lessons, $5 00 

1. The biography of St. Paul as presented in the Acts and Epis- 
tles. 2. The study of Philippians. 3. Events in the last week of our 
Lord's life. The study will be inductive. It will be to the advantage 
of the student to read in advance Stalker's " Life of St. Paul." 

Secretarial Work. — Instructor, J. T. Bowne. 

Twenty-four lectures, $5 00 

An Elementary Course on the Field, Objects, Organization, 
Methods, and Extension of Young Men's Christian Associations. 

Physical Department Work. — Lectures only. 

Instructor, F. N. Seerley. 

Six lessons, #2.00 

Same as regular course (see page 20). 

Library and Literature of Physical Education. — Use of library 
included. Instructor, Mary L. Janes. 

Six lessons, $2.00 

(Free to contributors.) 
Literature of the profession, use of public libraries, building up a 
private library, use of newspapers and other current literature, the 
card catalogue, general library economy, reviews of books and authors. 

Physiology. — Text-book, Martin's " Human Body," $2.20. 

Instructor, F. N. Seerley. 

Twenty-four lessons, $S-oo 

The same outline will be followed as for the regular course (see 
page 18), but less emphasis will be placed upon the subjective 
functions of the nervous system and the sense of sight. 

First Aid. — Text-book, Morton's " Hand Book of First Aid." 
Instructor, R. A. Clark. 

Twelve lessons, $3.00 

The tuition includes " Hand Book," cost of diploma, and 
bandages. Same as regular course (see page 19). 



37 



Physical Examination and Prescription of Exercise. — Text-book, 
Page's " Physical Diagnosis," $2.00. Instructor, R. A. Clark. 

Twenty-four lessons, $10.00 

Same as regular course (see page 19 % 4 and 7). 
Training. — Lectures only. Instructor, F. N. Seerley. 

Six lessons, $2.00 

General principles and effects on the body. Training for wind, 
muscle, endurance, speed, habit. Effects of each. Training for all- 
round athletic contest. Training for individual events : sprint run- 
ning, high jumping, long distance running, hammer throwing, putting 
shot, hurdle funning. 

Anthropometry. — Lectures only. Instructor, J. Naismith. 

Twelve lessons, $4.00 

Use of anthropometric apparatus. Measurements, how taken, 
preserved, and used. Bodily measurement charts and their mathemat- 
ical basis, the " percentile " method of Sir Francis Galton, an original 
method on the basis of the " mean." Typical versus perfect form. 
Proper use of anthropometric charts. Characteristics of different 
classes of gymnasts and athletes. Selection of men for competitive 
sports according to their physical characteristics. 

Swedish System of Educational Gymnastics.— Lectures and 
practice. Instructor, James Naismith. 

Eighteen lessons, $5.00 

Not a general study of gymnastics from a Swedish view, but a 
study of the distinctive features of the Swedish work, taking for 
granted a previous study of anatomy, physiology, and general gym. 
nasties. This will be presented from an association standpoint, and 
those features of the gymnasium practice which can be made use- 
ful in association work will be dwelt upon. 

Delsarte Gymnastics. — Lectures and practice. 

Instructor, J. S. Gaylord. 

Twenty-four lessons, $7.00 

Biographical sketch. Principles of Delsarte gymnastics : general 
principles of art ; the laws of expression, of correspondence, of oppo- 
sition ; the principle of trinity. ^Esthetic gymnastics considered in 
relation to physical, intellectual, and moral culture. Practice, includ- 
ing exercises in decomposing, energizing, harmonic poise and gesture. 
Application to various forms of work, play, and gymnastics. 



38 



Gymnastics, Fencing, and Wrestling. — H. F. Kallenberg and 

assistants. 

Elementary, twenty-four lessons, $5.00 

Advanced, twenty-four lessons, 5.00 

Fencing, twenty-four lessons, 12.00 

Wrestling, twelve lessons, 6.00 

Under elementary gymnastics such work will be taught as is best 
adapted to men who have not taken systematic exercise : free hand, 
wands, dumb bells, pulley weights, and apparatus work with buck, 
horse, vaulting, parallel, and high bars. The advanced course, for 
those who have mastered the " practice exercises," gives more com- 
plicated drills and difficult exercises. In the apparatus work, form 
and grace will be insisted upon. Suggestive exercises will be given 
to aid in the invention of drills. Classes will be formed in fencing 
and wrestling. 

Athletics and Aquatics. — Dr. Luther Gultck and assistants. 

Twenty-four lessons, $10.00 

Superior advantages are offered by the new athletic field. As in 
the regular course, special attention will be given to the five sports 
composing the Pentathlon (see page 22). Some attention will be 
given to other sports and games. Those who wish to play tennis 
should bring rackets. 

The opportunities for rowing and swimming should be emphasized. 
All the privileges of the regular school are offered to the summer 
students. (See page 22.) 



Each student in the Summer Course is expected to engage in at 
least three exercises per day, including practice, and is advised not to 
undertake more than four. Any courses may be chosen subject to the 
approval of the instructors. 

For a new student preparing for Secretarial work, a good element- 
ary course would be Bible study, organization, and methods of asso- 
ciation work, and practice in gymnastics and athletics. 

For one entering the school for the first time in preparation for 
the work of a physical director, a good course would be Bible study, 
physiology, and practice in gymnastics and athletics ; for a student 
who has already taken this in a previous year, physical examination 



39 



and prescription of exercise, first aid, and advanced gymnastics ; for 
a man of more experience a special course might include anthropom- 
etry, Swedish, or Delsarte work, fencing, or any studies selected ; 
and to any of these might be added one of the six lecture courses 
in training, management of the physical department, or literature ; 
enough new work has been added so that one who has already attended 
two or three sessions can easily spend the month profitably. 

Students planning for Physical Department work will notice that 
in several of the studies the outline covered is the same as that of the 
regular course. It will be possible to cover this only by long lessons 
each day and continuous, hard study. This arrangement has been 
made so that by attending the Summer Session two or more seasons 
and studying at home during the year, a man might fit himself to enter 
the school in the Senior year if he wished, thus completing the regular 
work of this department by one year at the school. The Correspond- 
ence Course will be valuable to those who follow this plan. 



The special lectures by men well known in Association circles will 
be a valuable addition to the course. The opening and closing 
addresses will be especially good. The library may be made very 
helpful. A great advantage to those who have recently entered the 
field is the opportunity for contact and acquaintance with others of 
larger experience, and the chance for conference and exchange of 
ideas should be valuable to all. 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 



The Summer Session is intended primarily for those who are already 
engaged in Association work. General secretaries and physical directors 
will be admitted without examination. Medical men college students, 
and others who are specially qualified may be admitted at the dis- 
cretion of the instructors. All will be required to fill out blanks 
giving necessary information for the records of the school. No 
reduction in fees will be made where only a part of a course is taken. 
Visitors are always welcome, and may be admitted to classes, lectures, 
or exercises, by permission of the officers. 



4 o 



Prospective students will do well to be on hand early, in order to 
get settled and ready for work. A month is short at the longest for 
what is anticipated, and this will involve that no time be lost in start- 
ing. The work will commence in full from the start. Those coming 
a day late will find it impossible to get all that is offered as no repe- 
tition can be made. 



EXPENSES FOR SUMMER COURSE. 



Tuition and books, determined by course taken. 

Room rent in building (see note below), or near, $5-50 to $7.00 

Board, 14.00 " 20.00 
Suits. — Those taking athletics should have jumping shoes which 

are sold here for about 4.50 

And running pants costing about 65 

And belt, 35 
Those working in the gymnasium will wear long, loose gray pants, 

costing here 3.00 

And black jerseys at about (for two) 4.00 

And gymnasium shoes, 2.20 
No tights will be allowed on the floor. 



Note. — The building will accommodate forty-four students. Those making the first applications 
for rooms will receive the first assignments. Room rent and washing of blankets, $5.50, must be 
paid in advance. Each student lodging in the building must care for his own room. He will be 
expected to provide sheets, pillow and bolster slips, towels, and soap. Beds are all single, 3 feet in 
width ; pillows, 18x26 inches ; bolsters, 18x36 inches. 

To engage rooms, address 

J. W. Stebbins, 44 Buckingham St., Springfield, Mass. 



FOR GENERAL INFORMATION 

concerning the School or its finances, apply to 

Oliver C. Morse, Secretary Int. Y. M. C. A. Training School, 
Springfield, Mass. 



FOR SPECIAL INFORMATION 

concerning the work of the Departments, address : 

J. T. Bowne, Supt. Secretarial Dept., 35 Clarendon St. 
Luther Gulick, M.D., Supt. Physical Dept., 153 Westminster St. 
Springfield, Mass. - 




DAILY SCHEDULE OF SUMMER SESSION. 





RECITATION ROOMS. 


GYMNASIUM. 


FIELD. 




8 


Bible Study. (24)* 






8 


9 


Physical Examination 
and Prescription of Ex- 
ercise. (24) 

Org. and methods of Y. 
M. C. A. work. (24) 






9 


IO 


Physiology. (24) 






10 


ii 




Fencing. (24) 


Athletics and Aquatics. 

(24) 


11 


12 




Wrestling. (12) 


Athletics and Aquatics. 

(24) 


12 


2 


First Aid and Bandag- 
ing. (12) 

Anthropometry. (12) 






2 


3 


Physical Dept. Asso. and 
its management. (6) 
Training, (6) 
Special Lectures. 






3 


4 




Gymnastics, Element- 
ary. (24) 


Athletics and Aquatics. 

(24) 


4 


5 




Gymnastics, Advanced. 

(24) 


Athletics and Aquatics. 

(24) 


5 


7 


Swedish System of Gym- 
nastics. (18) 
Library. (6) 


(Swedish.) 




7 


~8 


Delsarte Gymnastics. 

(24) 


(Delsarte.) 




8 



* Figures in brackets indicate the number of lectures or recitations. 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 



Inquiries concerning the finances will receive immediate attention 
if addressed to Oliver C. Morse, Secretary International Y. M. C. A. 
Training School, Springfield, Mass., and remittances may be made 
payable to his order. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 



I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian 
Association Training School, Springfield, Mass., the sum of 
dollars.* 



BEQUEST FOR ENDOWMENT. 



I give and bequeath to the International Young Men's Christian 
Association Training School, Springfield, Massachusetts, the sum of 
, to be safely invested by them and called 
the Fund. The interest of this fund to be 

applied to the use of the School.* 



PEPETUAL LOAN FUND. 



For the purpose of founding a perpetual loan fund in the Inter- 
national Young Men's Christian Association Training School, 
Springfield, Mass., (or either of its departments if so stated) I hereby 
give the sum of five thousand dollars — or its equivalent in good securi- 
ties at cash value — to be safely invested by them, the income to be 
loaned toward the education of students who have already shown 
ability in the School. 



♦Or the testator may specify, towards the current expenses ; or towards the support of a chair 
of instruction in the general course, or in either of the departments; or to be used as a loan towards 
the education of students who have shown ability in either of the departments.